When it comes to wild animals, chances are a lot of people don’t associate them with cities like New York. That is unless you count pigeons, rats and squirrels. But, look closer and you’ll discover a wide variety of untamed creatures in the Big Apple, from coyotes to opossums to skunks. On this week’s Cityscape, we’ll talk with a woman who helps to rehabilitate injured, sick and orphaned wild animals in the city. Also this week, New York City is home to tens of thousands of feral and stray cats. The New York City Feral Cat Initiative works to reduce the population with an approach known as TNR – trap, neuter, return. We'll talk with the group's director of TNR Education.

Direct download: cs170924.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

If you’re in the mood for sausage and peppers or a cannoli, there’s no better time to be in New York City. The San Gennaro Feast has taken over the streets of Manhattan’s Little Italy. The annual event has a long history in the neighborhood. In fact, it’s now in its 91st year. The San Gennaro festival runs through September 24th. On this week's Cityscape we're delving into the history of Little Italy and the San Gennaro Feast.

Direct download: cs170917.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Tracing your family history is as simple as ever thanks to genealogy websites and DNA ancestry test kits. For Brooklyn resident Andrew Van Dusen, the roots of his family tree were uncovered through a middle school class project. Van Dusen discovered that he was a 12th generation descendant of one of Manhattan’s first few hundred settlers. He's our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs170910.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

If you’re headed to a Labor Day weekend gathering, chances are someone will be serving hot dogs. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council estimates that Americans eat 20 billion hot dogs a year. The Council says over a third of hot dogs are consumed between Memorial Day and Labor Day. As peak hot dog eating season comes to an end, we bring you an episode devoted to the hot dog, or as it was sometimes referred to in the 1920s, the frankfurter sandwich.

Direct download: cs170903.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

With the summer quickly coming to a close, a lot of folks are looking to squeeze in at least one more trip to the beach. New York City is home to some pretty nice beach destinations. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re taking in the sand, surf, history and culture of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn. If you’re unfamiliar with Brighton Beach chances are you know its neighbor, Coney Island. But, like Coney, Brighton Beach also has distinct character all its own, and is often referred to as “Little Russia” for its large population of Russian immigrants.
 

Direct download: cs170827.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Just in time for the back-to-school season, a new novel is out about the trials and tribulations of being the class mom. The book is actually titled Class Mom. On this week's Cityscape, author Laurie Gelman joins us to talk about what inspired her to write a novel about a year in the life of a kindergarten class mom. Laurie is married to Michael Gelman, executive producer of “Live! With Kelly and Ryan." She has two kids and lives in Manhattan. We'll also hear a touching tale of motherhood from Meredith Fein Lichtenberg,  a board certified lactation consultant, parenting educator and non-fiction writer in Manhattan.

Direct download: cs170820.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

In a city like New York, new, trendy restaurants and shops open all the time. Sometimes all it takes is a photo of a delectable dish on Instagram to make an eatery a sensation. But, sometimes establishments are not celebrated for what's new, but for what's old. On this week's Cityscape, we're in for a sweet treat. And we mean that literally! We're going inside two establishments that have stood the test of time -- The Lexington Candy Shop, that's been in business for 92 years, and Economy Candy on the Lower East Side, which opened in 1937.

Direct download: cs170813.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

It’s a common scene in New York City – people hurrying down the sidewalk, many staring at their smartphones. But, while they’re looking down, architect Robert Arthur King is looking up. King specifically likes to take photographs of decorative stone carvings on the facades of buildings – faces, animal figures, flowers. These are sculptures mostly created by anonymous artisans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  King’s photographs of these sculptures are featured in 3 books – Faces in Stone, Animals in Stone and his latest, Figures in Stone. King is our guest on this week's Cityscape, along with New York City stone carver, Chris Pellettieri.

Direct download: cs170806.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City is a place of endless discoveries. But, sometimes it’s nice to escape the concrete jungle for greener pastures. On this week’s show, we’re heading north – roughly 30 miles north of Manhattan to be exact. We're visiting Kykuit, otherwise known as the John D. Rockefeller Estate in Sleepy Hollow. Its views are spectacular and its history is rich. We talked with two individuals with great knowledge of and appreciation for the property: Kykuit’s Curator Cynthia Altman and Larry Lederman, a photographer who’s out with a new book featuring magnificent images of the estate. It’s called The Rockefeller Family Gardens: An American Legacy.
 

 
File
Direct download: cs170730.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

You might not be familiar with his name, but you may have marveled at one of the many projects he’s been involved with. Leslie Earl Robertson is an American engineer who helped to create some of the most innovative and daring buildings of the modern era. Robertson was the lead structural engineer of the Twin Towers of the original World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan.  He worked on that project with architect Minoru Yamasaki. Yamasaki was just one of many internationally renowned architects Robertson got to work with. Robertson writes about his storied career in a new book called The Structure of Design: An Engineer’s Extraordinary Life in Architecture. He joins us in the studio this week to talk about it.

Direct download: cs170723.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT



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