To some they’re works of art or a unique form of expression -- to others they’re an abomination. We're talking about tattoos. A new exhibit at the New York Historical Society explores 300 years of tattooing in New York City. It’s called Tattooed New York. The exhibit traces tattooing from its roots in Native American body art to its embrace by sailors, soldiers and circus sideshow performers, through its place in mainstream culture today. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently walked through the exhibit with curator Cristian Petru Panaite.

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Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

This month marks the 143rd birthday of Harry Houdini. Houdini was born on March 24th,1874 as Erik Weisz in Budapest. But, eventually the legendary magician made his way to New York City, where he honed his craft of illusion and wowed audiences with death-defying escape acts and near-impossible stunts. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re tapping into the magic of Harry Houdini with a visit to the Houdini Museum of New York. It’s located within the headquarters of Fantasma Magic, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of magic tricks. We're also talking with a great nephew of Harry Houdini.

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Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Coping with the loss of someone or something you love can be one of life’s biggest challenges. Often, the pain of loss can feel overwhelming. You can be hit with a wave of unexpected emotions, from shock and anger to guilt and disbelief. In this program, we’ll get a better understanding of the grieving process and learn how to best confront painful emotions. Our guests are Ann Tramontana-Veno, the Executive Director of Hope After Loss. The Connecticut-based organization helps people through the loss of a pregnancy or an infant, and Deborah Oster Pannell, a resident of the Bronx who is representing A Caring Hand. The New York City-based organization offers a variety of programs to help grieving children and families.

Direct download: cs170312.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Behind every business, there’s a story worth knowing, like the story of the two sisters behind the wildly popular Alice’s Tea Cup restaurants in New York City, or the story behind the Willy Wonky of Bushwick, Brooklyn, Daniel Sklaar. Just how did the one-time financial analyst go on to open his Fine & Raw chocolate factory in 2012? On this edition of Cityscape, the story behind two successful New York City businesses. Both came to our attention this winter as we longed for hot drinks. Fine & Raw makes a mean hot chocolate, and Alice’s Tea Cup has a wide variety of teas to warm the body and soul.

Direct download: cs170305pod.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

The name might not be as familiar as Trump when it comes to development in New York City, especially these days, but Zeckendorf is a moniker that has played a pivotal role in shaping the city’s skyline.

First there was the larger-than-life William Zeckendorf senior, who among other things, assembled the land on which the United Nations rose in the late 1940’s. Then there was his much more understated son William Zeckendorf Junior who built several projects, including Worldwide Plaza in Manhattan. His sons have since carried on the family tradition.

Late in his life William Zeckendorf Junior penned a memoir. But, he died in 2014 before it was published. That’s where his wife Nancy comes in. She made it her mission to see her husband’s story told. Nancy has quite the story of her own. She’s a former principal dancer for the Metropolitan Opera Ballet. These days Nancy spends most of her time in Santa Fe, where she and Bill retired. But, she still has a home in New York City. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently caught up with her there for a chat.

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Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York is undeniably a magical city with its rich history, towering skyscrapers and plethora of things to do. But, it’s also magical in a literal sense. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re talking with a couple of the guys behind New York City’s longest running off-broadway magic show: Monday Night Magic.

Direct download: cs170219.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Love is in the air this time of year. And as Valentine’s Day approaches, a lot of people are searching for the perfect way to show that special someone how they feel about them. Of course, chocolate has become synonymous with Valentine’s Day. On this week's Cityscape, we’ll be delving into the history of chocolate, as well as visiting a chocolate shop in Lower Manhattan that had us at first bite. It's called Stick With Me Sweets. We're also exploring other "matters of the heart." More specifically -- Heart Gallery NYC. The non-profit organization taps the artistic talents of notable photographers to help kids in need of families and a permanent place to call home.

Direct download: cs170212.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

It’s one of life’s ultimate questions: Are you a cat person or a dog person? On this week’s Cityscape, we have something for both feline and canine lovers. We’ll talk with the founder of an organization that works to help improve the lives of homeless dogs in the New York City area. It’s called Foster Dogs NYC. We’ll also talk with Tamar Arslanian, the author of the book Shop Cats of New York, as well as the blog ihavecat.com

Direct download: cs170122.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

The Nutcracker ballet is a holiday classic featuring different styles of dance and a magical story. But what happens if you take the dancers off of the stage and thrust them into daily life? On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with photographer Jordan Matter about his books Dancers Among Us and Dancers After Dark that use professional dancers to see ordinary life in an extraordinary way. We'll also talk with someone who experienced Dancers After Dark from the other side of Jordan's camera lens, dancer Demetia Hopkins-Greene.

Direct download: cs170129.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

The New York Times recently named the South Bronx as one of the 52 places travelers should plan to visit in the coming year. Now, if you're hung up on images of what the South Bronx looked like in the 1970s and early 80s when burned-out buildings and gangs dominated the area, that probably comes as a big surprise. But, the South Bronx has come a long way over the years. It's no longer burning -- it's gentrifying. Take a walk around and you'll discover trendy coffee shops, galleries and boutiques. Public radio station, WNYC, is documenting the affordability crisis and changing neighborhoods across New York City. They're doing this one by one, and kicked things off with Mott Haven in the South Bronx. WNYC associate producer Sophia Paliza-Carre joins us on this week's Cityscape to talk about the project. We're also joined by a Bronx native on a mission to open an independent bookstore/wine bar in the South Bronx. Right now the Bronx doesn't have a single bookstore.

Direct download: cs160122.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT



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