Superstorm Sandy hit the tri-state area two months ago this Saturday. The storm flooded streets, highways, tunnels, buildings, and homes, and crippled the region's public transit system. Many places are still struggling to rebound from the storm, including the Rockaways in Queens. On this week's Cityscape, we’re taking a look at efforts to help residents of the hard-hit Rockaways rebuild their homes and lives in the aftermath of Sandy.

Direct download: cs1222912.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Who doesn’t love a good story? It’s through stories that we’re transported to magical places and introduced to unusual characters. If we’re listening carefully we usually learn something. We now invite you to sit back, relax and enjoy some holiday storytelling.

Direct download: cs12222012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30pm EDT

Kids today confront age old problems. Abuse, drugs, gang violence, living with dysfunctional families, teenage pregnancy. The list goes on and on. Many organizations in New York City work to keep young people out of trouble, some with more unique approaches, including one that uses basketball to keep kids on the straight and narrow.

Direct download: cs08112012r.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Hanukkah,the festival of lights, begins at sundown Saturday. On this week's Cityscape, a renowned storyteller and a singer-guitarist combine their talents to share a Hanukkah tale. Also this week, they say the neon lights are bright on Broadway. But, Times Square is not the only place in New York City where neon lights shine brightly. Architectural designer Thomas Rinaldi spent a number of years cataloging neon signs around the city. Signs that are slowly disappearing as lighting technology changes. Rinaldi joins us to talk about his new book appropriately titled New York Neon.

Direct download: cs12082012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

The holiday season is a time for celebrating with family, friends and colleagues. Quite often those get-togethers involve alcohol, and for that reason law enforcement officials say drunk driving is of particular concern right now. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing our attention on drunk driving issues, including an interview with a Manhattan man who lost his 11-year-old daughter in a drunk driving accident in 2009.

Direct download: cs120120122.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Superstorm Sandy destroyed thousands of homes in her path and flooded countless others.  People all along the upper East Coast, including in New York City, are now faced with the daunting task of rebuilding their homes and lives. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing our attention on rebuilding in the aftermath of Sandy.

Direct download: cs11242012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

With the economy the way it is, more and more families are relying on dual incomes and need somewhere for their kids to go after school. As part of WFUV’s Strike a Chord campaign, this week’s Cityscape is focusing its attention on after-school programs.

Direct download: cs11172012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

A lot of New Yorkers are still picking up the pieces following Superstorm Sandy. The storm's destruction in New York City got us thinking about how much we love the Big Apple. So this week we’re looking back on some of our favorite segments about the city. We're also talking with a clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University about the psychological effects of a disaster like Superstorm Sandy.

Direct download: cs11102012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Daylight saving time ends tomorrow at 2 AM in the U.S, which means Americans will turn their clocks back one hour. On this week's show we’ll be exploring the clocks of New York City, as well as talking with a Brooklyn guy who makes watches using parts from vintage timepieces.

Direct download: cs11052012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30pm EDT

New York City's still reeling from Superstorm Sandy. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with folks on the front lines of the relief efforts. We're also looking at the city's decision to cancel the New York City marathon.

Direct download: cs11032012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

The holiday season is a time for celebrating with family, friends and colleagues. Quite often those get-togethers involve alcohol, and for that reason law enforcement officials say drunk driving is of particular concern right now. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing our attention on drunk driving issues, including an interview with a Manhattan man who lost his 11-year-old daughter in a drunk driving accident in 2009.

Direct download: cs12012012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

As Halloween creeps closer, this week we’re exploring New York's creepy side with J.W. Ocker, author of The New York Grimpendium: A Guide to Macabre and Ghastly Sites in New York State. Also, forget trick or treating -- the founders of a Brooklyn-based candy company will tell us how to make candy in our very own kitchens. Jen King and Liz Gutman of Liddabit Sweets are out with a new candy cookbook.

Direct download: cs10272012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

With election day inching closer and closer, we’re focusing our attention on presidential politics on this week's Cityscape. We'll talk with an NYU religious studies professor about the role faith plays in politics. We'll also check in with a presidential studies professor at Hofstra University about the impact debates have on White House runs. And, we'll talk with a New York City-based artist who is making his creative voice heard this election season with an exhibit titled Your Land/My Land: Election ’12. The exhibit is being staged simultaneously at museums across the U.S., including at the New Museum in New York City.

Direct download: cs10202012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City’s home to world famous art museums, like the MET, MoMA and the Guggenheim. But, on this week's Cityscape we’re discovering art in the unlikeliest of places – including a hair salon and hospital examination rooms

Direct download: cs10132012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

People spend a lot of time on the streets of Manhattan looking up at the skyscrapers that surround them. But not many people get to look at the city from above unless it’s from an observatory like the one at the Empire State Building or on Top of the Rock. On this week's Cityscape we’re seeing the city through the lens of two photographers with different vantage points. Alex MacLean photographs the city from the air and Stewart Mader captures unique views of New York (and occasionally other cities) from rooftops, balconies, and other vantage points above the street.

Direct download: cs10062012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Every Saturday, WFUV's Cityscape explores the people, places and spirit of New York City in new and unique ways. We journey to fascinating places and meet interesting people, but we wouldn’t be able to do that without support from listeners who appreciate this kind of programming. On this week's Cityscape, we're doing what we always do -- making new discoveries (including an interview about a new species of ant uncovered in Manhattan) -- while asking you to do your part with a pledge of financial support.

Direct download: cs09292012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

As we move from summer to fall -- change is in the air. With that in mind we’re going with a theme of “change” on this week's Cityscape. We'll learn the science behind why leaves change color, find out how and why voices change, learn about the name changing process in New York City, and talk with a photographer who has documented the city's changing landscape.

Direct download: cs09222012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City’s been home to and has inspired countless musicians over the years, from Bob Dylan to the Doo Wop group, Dion and the Belmonts. Musical history runs deep throughout the five boroughs. The South Bronx is the birthplace of hip hop and many punk and other types of rock bands got their start on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. On this week's Cityscape we're exploring the city's musical roots.

Direct download: cs09152012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Amateur Night at Harlem's famed Apollo Theater has launched the careers of some of the world’s greatest artists, including Ella Fitzgerald and the Jackson Five. But, not all of them were initially well-received. On this week's Cityscape, we’re talking with Billy Mitchell, the Apollo's in-house historian, goodwill ambassador and tour director about the theater’s rich history.

Direct download: cs09082012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Picture it. New York City minus the high-rise buildings. Anyone who wants to get a glimpse of what the city looked like before all of the concrete, should look no further than the New York Botanical Garden. On this week's Cityscape we’ll pay a visit to a 50-acre native forest in the Bronx. We'll also go foraging for food in Central Park, and we're not talking about looking for the nearest hot dog vendor. We're talking about seeking out edible plants. Believe it or not, Central Park is ripe for the picking.

Direct download: cs09012012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City’s mostly surrounded by water, but it’s easy to get caught up in the concrete jungle and forget about the serenity you can find just off the shore. On this week's Cityscape, we’re looking to the water for stories of inspiration, including the tale of a Manhattan man’s life-changing love for sailing.

Direct download: cs08252012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

When people think of New York's islands, they think of Manhattan, City Island, Coney Island or Staten Island. But there are more than three dozen other islands scattered throughout the city's waters, each with their own rich history and unique identity. On this week's Cityscape, we’ll be learning all about New York’s “other” islands.

Direct download: cs08182012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Kids today confront age old problems -- abuse, drugs, gang violence, living with dysfunctional families, teenage pregnancy. The list goes on and on. Many organizations in New York City work to keep young people out of trouble, some with more unique approaches, including one that uses basketball to keep kids on the straight and narrow.  On this week's Cityscape, a panel discussion on youth issues in New York City.

Direct download: cs08112012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Even in today’s digital age, chalk is still a common instrument for communication and artistic expression. Teachers use it to write out lessons. Kids use sidewalks and chalk to let their imaginations run wild. On this week's Cityscape, we’re exploring chalk as a powerful tool for communication and self-expression. The show includes:

  • An interview with a sidewalk artist.
  • A look at a program in Northern Manhattan that uses chalk art to spread a message about living a healthy lifestyle.
  • A look at why doctors on Ellis Island put chalk marks on immigrants they deemed ill.
Direct download: cs08042012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

A lot of people are familiar with Coney Island’s storied past, but Rockaway Beach has an interesting history all its own. In fact, the Queens community was once a bustling, summer hot spot chock full of hotels and amusements that drew millions of visitors. Today, a new generation of visitors is discovering Rockaway Beach. There’s even a new weekend bus service shuttling people there from Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Vivian Rattay Carter tells the tale of Rockaway Beach from its earliest beginnings in her new book Images of America: Rockaway Beach. Carter's our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs07282012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

It’s a summer tradition for a lot of New Yorkers – escaping the city for the serenity of the Hamptons. Dan Rattiner knows all about the summer hotspot. He’s been writing about it for years. Dan founded the free weekly newspaper, Dan’s Papers, in 1960. He was just 20 years old then. He’s still a staple on the East End of Long Island and out with a new book called Still in the Hamptons: More Tales of the Rich, the Famous and the Rest of Us. Dan's our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs07212012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Between ice cream trucks, food carts and brick and mortar parlors, you can’t go a block in New York City without stumbling on a place to get an ice cream fix. On this week's Cityscape we’re exploring ice cream in New York City, including one parlor on Manhattan’s Lower East Side that’s "changing lives one scoop at a time."

Direct download: 07142012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Beer has a long and storied history in New York City, in part due to the influence of German immigrants. On this week’s Cityscape we’re delving deep into the history of beer in the Big Apple, as well as taking a look at the city’s suds resurgence in recent years.

Direct download: cs07072012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Don Kirshner is not exactly a household name, but if you’ve listened to popular music in the last 50 years or so, you’ve probably heard his influence. Who Put the Bomp was one of about 200 songs the music producer helped turn into hits in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s. Don Kirshner, a Bronx native, died in January of last year of heart failure at the age of 76. A new book explores the career of this pop-music hit maker. It’s called Don Kirshner: The Man with the Golden Ear. Author Rich Podolsky is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs06302012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

No doubt there are a lot of political junkies out there who spend a good deal of time flipping between cable news channels. But, you also have people who are deeply concerned about issues like the economy and education who don't follow the political process too closely. Getting people more engaged is critical to ensuring candidates address the issues facing ALL Americans. With the November elections inching closer, many organizations are in overdrive working to get people more excited to head to the polls and have their voices heard. And they have their work cut out for them. Voter turnout here in New York City is low with a capital "L". WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign on electoral engagement continues this weekend on Cityscape with a look at various efforts to boost political consciousness in New York City and beyond.

Direct download: CS06232012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Inspired by the furry friends they work with every day, the New York City-based band Pet-Rox is made up of pet professionals of all stripes. The group was founded by a veterinarian, but also includes a cat rescuer and a whole host of others in the animal welfare community. Pet-Rox has just completed their first album called "Just Sniffing Around.” The group’s founder, lead singer and rhythm guitarist Doctor Jeffery Levy, as well as two members of the band, Jackie Krim and Leslie Hughs, recently joined us in WFUV’s very own studio A.

Direct download: cs06162012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

For a lot of people, especially young, single people, the only way to afford to live in New York City is to get a roommate. On this week’s Cityscape, "Roommating 101."  We'll explore how to find a roommate, your rights as a roommate, and how to make a roommate situation work even in a tiny studio apartment.

Direct download: cs06092012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

On this week's Cityscape, author Andrew Goldstein talks about his debut novel, The Bookie’s Son. The coming of age tale draws on Goldstein’s own childhood in the Bronx in the 1960s. It's told through the eyes of 12-year-old Ricky Davis, who wants to rescue his parents from themselves -- and from the ravages his father's gambling habit threatens to wreak on his family.

Direct download: cs06022012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Street food in New York City has a long and rich history. In fact, pushcart vending in New York dates all the way back to the late 1600’s. Fast forward more than three centuries, and street food is as popular as ever. On this week's Cityscape, we’re digging into street food culture in New York City, and exploring what it takes to get into the food truck business. Also, a cemetery might be the last place you’d think to go to explore the city’s culinary past. But, Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx is the final resting place of a veritable who’s who of culinary greats. The cemetery recently held a tour of noteworthy gravesites related to the city’s food history. On this week's show, we'll pay the cemetery a visit to learn more about the famous foodies buried there.

Direct download: cs05262012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Saturday is “It’s My Park Day” in New York City -- an annual event in which New Yorkers give a little back to their favorite parks. Residents in all five boroughs will be taking time to spruce up parks and playgrounds in their neighborhoods. It’s volunteer efforts like this one that New York City Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe says make a big difference in the care and upkeep of parks. Commissioner Benepe is our guest on this week's Cityscape. He'll talk with us about the state of the city’s parks system and a whole bunch more, including how music helps to inspire him to build and maintain parks.

Direct download: cs05192012.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

It’s the kind of story that keeps moviegoers on the edge of their seats -- a lethal pandemic quickly spreads through a crowded city as the medical community races to stop it. But, throughout history, health officials in New York City have had their own real-life dramas dealing with disease, including bouts with smallpox.  Today there are vaccines available to protect adults and children against at least 17 diseases, but health officials sometimes struggle to convince people that vaccines are safe. A new exhibit set to open Tuesday at the New-York Historical Society explores the history of vaccination, including the conflict between the need to manage disease in an urban environment and the rights of individuals to resist government interference in their private lives. Joining us on this week's Cityscape is the exhibition’s team, as well as an immunization expert from the New York City Health Department.

Direct download: cs05122012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

For an artist, inspiration can strike at any moment. Something as simple as a sunset might inspire a painter to reach for a brush. The birth of a child might prompt a musician to pen a new song. But, it’s not always happy occasions that spark an artist to launch a new project. On this week’s Cityscape, we’ll talk with New York City artists who are turning cancer diagnoses into artistic statements.

Direct download: cs05052012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

On this week’s Cityscape, host George Bodarky's conversation with author Steven Schrader, whose dad was known as a "king of 7th Avenue fashion." Schrader’s new book, called Threads, explores his childhood in Washington Heights in the 40’s and 50’s, his strained relationship with his dressmaking guru father, and the road he took to becoming a published writer.

Direct download: cs04282012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

With so much diversity in New York City, it’s no wonder there are so many extraordinary stories to tell. This week we’re taking a look back at some of our favorite characters on Cityscape -- programs showcasing some of the remarkable and fascinating personalities dotting the city's landscape.

Direct download: cs04172010.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

A hundred years ago this weekend, the RMS Titanic hit an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic as it made its way from Southampton to New York City. It was the ship’s maiden voyage, and a century later the story of the tragedy still captures people’s imaginations. On this week's Cityscape, we're exploring New York City's connections to Titanic. We'll hear about how New York City reacted to the news of the disaster, explore some of the Titanic memorials in the city, and learn about where some of the Titanic victims and survivors are buried in the five boroughs.

Direct download: cs04142012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

We’re all familiar with the phrase “reduce, reuse, recycle.” But, for some people, that goes far beyond just separating their trash into paper, plastic and glass. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re talking with people who keep New York City’s history and character alive by turning the old into something new, including an artist who turns newspaper bins into aquariums and police barricades into tables. 

Direct download: cs04072012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

We couldn't find a time-traveling portal to take us back to 19th century New York City, so we did the next best thing.  On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with New Yorkers who incorporate the 19th century into their modern-day lives.

Direct download: cs03312012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Late 19th century New York City was not the city we know and love today. In 1895, when Theodore Roosevelt began his stint as police commissioner, corruption was rampant, and the city was teeming with prostitutes and gambling joints.  On this week's show, we’re looking back on those sin-loving days in New York City, with the author of a new book called Island of Vice.  We'll also hear about opportunities to walk the same floor boards as those who came before us from the Executive Director of the Historic House Trust of New York City.

Direct download: cs03242012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

St. Patrick's Day is a big deal in New York City. Even people who don't have a drop of Irish blood in their veins wear green and celebrate the day. On this week's Cityscape, we're getting into the spirit of the Irish with an exploration of Irish history and culture in New York City.

Direct download: cs03172012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

The subject of bullying frequently dominates the headlines, but coming up on Monday, March 19th, the issue will take center stage on Broadway. A non-profit organization called What’s the Benefit has created a fantasy-rock musical that explores the effects of bullying. The one-night only performance will benefit Operation Respect, an anti-bullying group founded by Peter Yarrow of Peter Paul and Mary fame.

Direct download: cs03102012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Over the last few weeks, and continuing through mid-March, WFUV has been giving animals a voice – by showcasing organizations that work to care for and protect animals in public service announcements. And this week, we're featuring a series of special reports on animal welfare in our daily newscasts. On this week's Cityscape, we’re continuing our coverage of animal welfare issues. Our program includes a look at efforts to reduce New York City's feral cat population, as well as a peek inside a pet food pantry in Westchester County.

Direct download: cs03032012.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

We've all heard the saying "birds of a feather flock together" -- meaning people of similar tastes hang out with each other. On this week's Cityscape, we catch up with "birds of a feather" groups in New York City, including a ukulele meetup and a juggling club. We'll also talk with a psychiatrist to get a better understanding of what drives the "birds of a feather" mentality.

Direct download: cs02252012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City’s saturated with advertisements. They’re on buses, in the subways, atop taxis, and along highways. But, it’s not the newest Calvin Klein ad that catches the attention of acclaimed photographer and urban documentarian Frank Jump. He likes to document so-called ghost signs in the city. These ads from a bygone era are visible, but often overlooked -- and for Jump, they’re also a metaphor for his own long survival with HIV. Several of Jump’s photographs are included in a new book called Fading Ads of New York City. Jump is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs02182012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

We’ve all come across bad manners in our lifetime, the straphanger who spits in front of us on the subway platform – the man or woman who cuts into the line at the deli. But, while it’s easy to spot bad manners, it’s harder to recognize good manners in today’s fast-paced, digital society. In his book, Would It Kill You to Stop Doing That?: A Modern Guide to Manners, author Henry Alford aims to find out what good manners look like in an era of constantly beeping cell phones and live-tweeting. Alford's our guest on this week's on Cityscape.

Direct download: cs02112012.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

A lot of songs have been written over the years about work. From Dolly Parton’s 9 to 5 to The Who’s The Dirty Jobs to Rose Royce’s Car Wash. Veteran Bronx defense attorney Elliott Shapiro writes songs about work. In fact, he’s penned a number of tunes that reflect his more than 40-year-legal career. He joined Cityscape Host George Bodarky in WFUV’s very own Studio A to perform some of his songs and talk about life in the courthouse.

Direct download: cs02042012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Every Saturday morning, WFUV's Cityscape explores New York City in new and unique ways. We journey to fascinating places, like deep below Grand Central Terminal, and we meet interesting people, like a singing sanitation worker. But, we can't do any of it without listener support. Join us for Cityscape this Saturday morning for our usual exploration of the Big Apple, and to do your part for commercial-free, member-supported public radio, WFUV.

Direct download: cs01282012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City is a veritable feast for all senses. From its skyscrapers – to its street food – to its musical performances – there’s so much to see, hear, taste, smell and touch in the Big Apple. In fact, tourists often describe a visit here in two words -- "sensory overload." On this week's Cityscape, we’re exploring the five senses in a whole host of ways.

Direct download: cs01212012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City is known for doing things big – from its New Year’s Eve celebration to its Thanksgiving Day parade. So, perhaps it should come as no surprise that the city is home to several world record breakers, including the man who holds the world record for holding the most world records. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with world record breakers who call New York City home.

Direct download: cs01142012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

If you want to transport yourself to a place much more exotic or mysterious than New York City, you can most certainly achieve that goal through an expensive vacation. But, another way to immerse yourself in a foreign land is through a good book. From the state of independent booksellers to a Manhattan hotel with a library theme, this week's Cityscape is all about books.

Direct download: cs01072012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT



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