What does the future hold for New York City? As we stand at the brink of a new year, we’re looking at some exciting projects in the works: from an underground park in Manhattan, to a swimming pool in the East River to a giant observation wheel on Staten Island.

Direct download: cs131228.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Winter is here, for the next three long months. We’re all familiar with the phrase the winter blues, but how do you get through the dark, cold months without getting the doldrums? On this week’s Cityscape, we’re looking at ways to avoid letting the winter get the best of you. We’ll be talking with a clinical psychiatrist about ways to beat “cabin fever,” as well as simply searching out fun things to do to get your mind off the cold.

Direct download: cs131221.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

According to culinary historians, the first cookies were made by accident. Cooks used a small amount of cake batter to test oven temperatures before baking a large cake.  And so, the decadent dessert was born. During the holidays, the smell of fresh baked cookies is ubiquitous. What’s your favorite type of cookie? Chocolate chip, oatmeal, maybe Snickerdoodle? On this week’s Cityscape, we talk cookie legacies, creative recipes, and “Baking it Forward.”

Direct download: cs131214.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

The New York City taxi is an iconic automobile with a rich social history, and some of the men – and women – that get us from point A to point B have seen a lot along the way.  This week's Cityscape is all about the taxi – from personal stories of cab drivers, to high tech cabs, to taxis doubling as photography studios.

Direct download: cs131207.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Singer, pianist, composer and Brooklyn native Neil Sedaka is famous for writing songs like the 1962 hit, Breaking Up is Hard to Do. But his career stalled when the Beatles shot to prominence, and for 12 years Sedaka struggled to get back on the charts. On this week's Cityscape we'll talk with author Rich Podolsky about his new book Neil Sedaka: Rock’n’Roll Survivor: The Inside Story of His Incredible Comeback.

Direct download: cs131130.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

If you notice more men growing facial hair this month, it may be because of Movember, a movement to raise awareness about men’s health in November. With that in mind, this week's Cityscape is all about facial hair. We'll talk with playwright and circus performer Jennifer Miller, who has lived most of her life as a woman with a beard. We'll also check in with the president of Gotham City Beard Alliance. And, for those who want to lose the facial hair, we'll visit a Manhattan barber shop that's always ready to provide a good old fashioned shave.

Direct download: cs131116.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Food pantries and soup kitchens provide a lifeline to countless individuals and families in need of assistance. They often get a ton of volunteers around the holidays, but food pantries and soup kitchens need help all year long.  As part of WFUV’s Strike a Chord Campaign, this episode of Cityscape takes a look at the demand for emergency food assistance in New York City, and the efforts of food pantries and soup kitchens to meet that demand. 

Direct download: cs131109.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

The big city is full of bright lights, but since daylight saving ends this weekend, it’s time to turn back the clocks and extend darkness a little longer. With that in mind, we're focusing on clocks and darkness on this week's Cityscape. We'll pay a visit to a good old-fashioned clock repair shop in Manhattan. We’re also talking about how the invention of artificial lighting influenced the work of writers and artists in early New York City, and attending a dance party in the dark in Brooklyn.

Direct download: cs131102.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Each week, WFUV's Cityscape explores the people, places and spirit of New York City in new and unique ways. We journey to fascinating places and meet interesting people, but we wouldn’t be able to do that without support from listeners who appreciate this kind of programming. WFUV is a commercial free, member supported, public radio station. We rely on contributions from listeners like you to keep Cityscape going strong. In this episode, we’re here to do what we always do, and that’s bring you great stories and discoveries. But we need you to do your part, and that’s make a financial pledge of support at WFUV.org.

Direct download: cs131026.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

What do the Bee Gees, waterbeds, and pet rocks all have in common? How about platform shoes, The Hustle, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show? They were all popular in the 1970s. On this week's Cityscape, we’re exploring New York City in the 70s -- the photography, the music, and the fashion. But it wasn’t all disco and bell bottoms – the city experienced rampant crime and was on the brink of financial disaster in the '70s. We'll explore that side of 1970s NYC as well.

Direct download: cs131019.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

“Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.” Studies suggest early risers are generally happier and more productive than night owls.  Coming up on this week's Cityscape we’ll learn about why that is, as well as hear from people around New York City who are up before the sun rises.

Direct download: cs131012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

WFUV is hosting a dance party at Webster Hall Saturday night (10/5/13). It’s called the “Rock Your Body Dance Party."  With that in mind, this week’s Cityscape is delving into the history of Webster Hall, as well as looking into the laws governing dance in New York City. We'll also catch up with some Celtic dancers in the city, and hear about a lunch time dance party in the Big Apple.

Direct download: cs131005.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

If you think you have to go outside New York City’s “walls” to go rock climbing, think again. There are plenty of climbable boulders scattered across the concrete jungle. A new guidebook details some of New York’s best climbing spots. On this week’s Cityscape we talk with the author of NYC Bouldering, Garreth Leah, as well as learn all about the geology of New York City. And as long as we’re talking about "rock," we’ll pay a visit to The School of Rock on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

Direct download: cs130928.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

The "moving to New York City" story has become a cliche. We often hear about people who move to the city from other parts of the country. But, let's not forget about those who come here from overseas. On this week's Cityscape, we'll hear about the unique experiences of two people who moved to the city during very different time periods, including the love story of an immigrant from Jamaica in the early 1900s.

Direct download: cs130921.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

If you ever wondered what it would be like to work under the Big Top -- wonder no more. On this week’s Cityscape we’re talking with the founder of the Big Apple Circus, Paul Binder, about his new book Never Quote the Weather to a Sea Lion. It includes a whole bunch of uncommon tales from life in the circus.

Direct download: cs130914.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

When you’re looking for greenery and open spaces, the concrete jungle may not strike you as the place to go. But there are dozens of urban landscapes dotting all corners of the five boroughs that you can visit and explore yourself. Take the High Line. It was once an elevated railroad track for freight trains and now it’s a lush aerial greenway. A new book tours thirty-eight “urban gems” throughout New York City. Our guests this week are Robin Lynn and Francis Morrone, authors of Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes.

Direct download: cs130907.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Think back to your childhood. What were your dreams? How did you see your life playing out before the realities of adulthood set in? How many of those dreams came true?  On this week's Cityscape, we’re talking about childhood dreams relived and realized.

Direct download: cs130831.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Day in and day out, we’re being watched, and we’re watching others. Let’s face it -- New York City is prime for people watching. So much happens on these streets that it would be impossible not to be a participant of this spectator sport. On this week’s Cityscape we’re exploring the art of people watching in the Big Apple.

Direct download: cs130824.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

While not as glorified in popular media and guide books as Manhattan or Brooklyn, Queens contributes a whole lot to what makes New York City, New York City. It's home to the city's two airports, the city's only working farm, and a whole lot more. In this encore edition of Cityscape, we're exploring what's touted as the most ethnically diverse county in the United States.

Direct download: encore.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

If you were around during the disco era, you’re more than likely familiar with the dance craze the Hustle. Like most dance crazes, the simple moves and catchy tune helped it -- to use a modern phrase -- go viral. But, what is it about other things like sneakers, Apple products and even the Halal cart on 53rd Street and 6th Avenue in Manhattan that catch on, drawing lines that scale around several blocks? On this week's Cityscape, we're talking about crazes, from the cronut to the Harlem Shake to the Greek yogurt craze.

Direct download: cs130810.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Between 250 and 300-thousand men and women from New York City served in the U.S. armed forces during the Vietnam War. 1,741 of them lost their lives. Their names are displayed at Vietnam Veterans Memorial Plaza in lower Manhattan. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re looking at Vietnam from a New York City point of view.

Direct download: cs130803.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

During the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, poet Walt Whitman declared it “the grandest physical habitat and surroundings of land and water the globe affords." His poem “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” is celebrated by poetry lovers every year in an event in which they cross the Brooklyn Bridge reading poems about the bridge and city. So many poets, like Jack Kerouac and Frank O’Hara have drawn inspiration from New York City. And the city continues to be a literary muse for poets today. On this week's Cityscape, we're tapping into New York City's poetry community -- past and present.

Direct download: CS130727.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Does the clack clack sound of typewriter keys make you nostalgic? How about the crackle of vinyl spinning on a record player? You may consider typewriters and record players relics of the past, but there are plenty of people keeping them alive and well. In this episode of Cityscape we talk with people using machines from decades past.

Direct download: cs130720.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

At any time of year in New York City, the smell of warm pretzels wafts through the streets. Most hot dog vendors sell them from their carts. But many New Yorkers say they don’t taste as good as they smell, so chefs have been introducing new twists to the salted bread. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re digging our teeth into the pretzel.

Direct download: cs130713.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

You see them along the East and Hudson Rivers, and snaking through Central Park. Arms pumping with a determined look on their faces. We’re talking about runners. They’re pretty much everywhere in New York City. On this week's show we're delving into the world of runners, including efforts to get kids into the sport as a way to inspire them to get fit and stay in school. We'll also talk with the author of a new book called Runners and Lovers. The novel is set in the Riverdale section of the Bronx.

Direct download: cs130706.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

You mostly hear New Yorkers complaining about pigeons, but there are many people whose love for the birds runs deep. Even former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson called pigeons his first love, having grown up surrounded by them in his Brooklyn neighborhood. Today, Tyson races pigeons. His passion for the sport even spawned a reality show on Animal Planet called Taking on Tyson. But as you’ll hear on this edition of Cityscape, pigeons have a polarizing influence on New Yorkers. They either love 'em or hate 'em… Some interesting pigeon facts:

• Although pigeons are considered by many to be dirty and disease-ridden, there’s little evidence linking pigeons directly to infections in humans. The New York City Department of Health states only contact in high exposure with pigeon droppings can pose a small health risk.

• Despite common perception, there is no law that prohibits pigeon feeding everywhere in New York City. That said, the Parks Department posts notices in many areas prohibiting feeding. So it’s OK to feed the pigeons as long as there are no signs saying you can’t.

• Paul Julius Reuter founded the Reuters news agency, which got its start using pigeons bearing news and stock prices between Berlin and Paris. Carrier pigeons were much faster than the post train.

Direct download: cs130629.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

A mental illness is a medical condition that causes mild to severe disturbances in thinking, perception and behavior.  Recovery is possible. But there are many misconceptions about mental illness, which can lead to a variety of problems, like troubling finding work or housing. 

As part of WFUV’s Strike a Chord campaign, this week’s Cityscape is focusing its attention on mental illness and efforts to combat the stereotypes. 

Direct download: cs130622.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

They collect our garbage, and plow our streets after a snowfall – but New York City's sanitation workers often don’t get a whole lot of appreciation. On this week's Cityscape, we’re focusing our attention on the city’s sanitation workers, and we'll learn why it’s not okay to call them garbage men. Our guest is Robin Nagle, the sanitation department’s anthropologist in residence. She'll join us to talk about her new book Picking Up: On the Streets and Behind the Trucks with the Sanitation Workers of New York City. We'll also dip into the Cityscape archives for segments with the city’s first female sanitation worker, as well as one with the late Andrew Macchio, a sanitation worker who loved to sing behind the truck.

Direct download: cs130615.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Walking around the streets of New York City, its usually hard not to peer into the windows of the apartments and brownstones you pass and comparing the space to your own.

Connie Rosenblum was the author of the "Habitats" column published in the Real Estate section of the New York Times. She used real estate as the gateway to telling the stories of New York City residents, of all boroughs and backgrounds. She's put together expanded versions of a selection of the "Habitats" column in a book called Habitats: Private Lives in the Big City. This week on Cityscape we hear some of those stories.

Direct download: cs130601.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City is known as the “concrete jungle,” but you won’t be hard pressed to find flowers here. From blossoms in Central Park to the bodega variety.

On this morning’s show, we’re talking flowers. We’ll learn how to arrange a bouquet with deli flowers and visit a flower shop that doubles as a bar at night. We'll also visit a shop in the flower district that has been around for four generations.

Direct download: cs130608.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:56pm EDT

Mental illness is a topic a lot of us are reluctant to talk about. That’s due in large part to the many misconceptions about mental illness, which can lead to a wide variety of problems, from discrimination at work to difficulty finding housing. Coming up in June, WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign will turn its attention to helping to combat the stigma of mental illness. We're getting a jump start on that campaign on this week's Cityscape as we sit down with actress Glenn Close and members of her family who are living with mental illness. Close co-founded an organization called Bring Change 2 Mind, which works to address misconceptions about mental illness.

Direct download: cs130525.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Her story reads like a Hollywood film: A woman who seems healthy is quarantined on a remote island off New York City because it’s feared she’s spreading a deadly disease.

Mary Mallon – better known as Typhoid Mary -- spent much of her life quarantined on North Brother Island.  So close, but yet so far away from the hustle and bustle of Manhattan.  She was the first known healthy carrier of typhoid fever. Author Mary Beth Keane penned a novel based on Mary Mallon's life. It's called "Fever," and we're talking with her on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs130518.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Sunday is Mother’s Day. A day to celebrate moms and all they do. But not any one relationship between a mother and child is the same. On this week's Cityscape, we’re exploring the role of mothers in our lives and in society. Our guests include the founder of the Museum of Motherhood in Manhattan.

Direct download: cs130511.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 masterpiece novel “The Great Gatsby” will once again come to life on the silver screen next week. The latest film adaptation of the novel stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Tobey Maguire. The movie promises roaring 20s' glamor, excess and excitement, but we thought, why should Hollywood have all the fun? On this week's Cityscape, we’re looking back on the 1920s in New York City – the music, the fashion, the dancing, and even the mobsters.

Direct download: cs130504.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City is a great big playground for kids. Take a journey through the five boroughs and you’ll find plenty of kid-friendly activities, from museums to outdoor fairs. On this week's Cityscape, we'll explore many of the cool things kids can see and do in New York City. We'll also talk with the author of a new book that helps young learners gain a better understanding of the Big Apple’s rich history.

Direct download: cs130427.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Each week Cityscape explores the people, places and spirit of New York City in new and unique ways. We journey to fascinating places and meet interesting people, but we wouldn’t be able to do that without support from listeners who appreciate this kind of programming. 

Unknown Object

On this week's edition of Cityscape, we're revisiting some of our favorite segments while asking for your support.  Segments include a Queens couple who live with 23 parrots, our last interview with the late Mayor Ed Koch, the owner of Manhattan by Sail, and the authors of New York Neon and Garden Guide NYC.

Direct download: cs130420.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

In the musical Annie, the lead character meets and comforts a stray dog named Sandy. Every dog that’s played Sandy since Annie’s world premiere in 1976 has been a rescue. On this week's Cityscape, we'll meet the man who found and trained that original Sandy, and has since turned countless other shelter animals into Broadway and Hollywood stars. William Berloni writes about rescuing animals and turning them into stars in his book Broadway Tails: Heartfelt Stories of Rescued Dogs Who Became Showbiz Superstars.

Direct download: cs130413.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

As the song goes, if you can make it here, you’ll make it anywhere.  A lot people come to New York City to follow their dreams, but the road to fulfillment can sometimes be a bumpy one. On this week's Cityscape we're looking into the challenges people sometimes face as they try to make it in New York City, including artists and new immigrants.

Direct download: cs130406.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

On this edition of Cityscape, we're exploring some traditional Easter themes with inspiration from rabbits and dyed eggs. We'll get advice from the International House Rabbit Society on how to best take care of a rabbit, and we'll also talk with the owners of Long Island City-based Manic Panic, an internationally renowed hair dye and cosmetics company known for their funky hair dye colors. And we'll check in with a moving company that fits the theme only in name. The moving company "Rabbit Movers" has a staff comprised entirely of artists.

Direct download: cs130330.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

How does one go from rubbing elbows with likes of Bette Davis and Elizabeth Taylor to finding themselves in the midst of the Attica Prison riot in 1971?  Our guest on this edition of Cityscape is David Rothenberg.  Rothenberg is the founder of the Fortune Society, an organization that helps ex-convicts get their lives back on track. He launched the Fortune Society in 1967, but before that he was a press agent for some of the most successful Broadway productions of the 20th century, including Richard Burton’s Hamlet and Hair. So what lured him away from the bright lights of Broadway to a life of helping people leaving the dark world of prison?  Rothenberg joins us to talk about his new book Fortune in My Eyes:  A Memoir of Broadway Glamour, Social Justice and Political Passion.

Direct download: cs130323.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Superstorm Sandy showed us all how easy it is to lose everything in an instant. Hundreds of people were left homeless from the storm -- highlighting the need for more emergency housing in times of crisis. As part of WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign, on this edition of Cityscape we're highlighting non-profit organizations in the tri-state area that assist people with housing needs in various situations, not just catastrophes like Sandy. We'll talk with a Long Island organization that helps young mothers with nowhere to go, a group that helps heart patients and their families with housing needs, and an organization that provides housing assistance to struggling musicians.

Direct download: cs130316.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

March is National Noodle Month, declared by the National Pasta Association. In this noodle themed edition of Cityscape we'll hear from the family of Shorty Tang, purveyor of a popular noodle dish in 1960s and 70s New York City that still remains in the memories of people who ate it. We'll also learn about where to get the best noodles in the city from Zagat and talk with a Japanophile turned Ramen guru about his upcoming Lower East Side noodle shop.

This episode is guest hosted by Cityscape producer Morlene Chin.

Direct download: cs130309.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

While not as glorified in popular media and guide books as Manhattan or Brooklyn, Queens contributes a whole lot to what makes New York City, New York City. It's home to the city's two airports, the city's only working farm and a whole lot more. On this week's Cityscape, we're exploring what's touted as the most ethnically diverse county in the United States.

Direct download: cs03022013.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City’s constantly evolving. But, there are some institutions in the city that have stood the test of time. This year marks the 100th anniversary of at least three of them – Grand Central Terminal, the Woolworth Building in Lower Manhattan and El Diaro – the nation’s longest publishing Spanish language daily newspaper. On this week's Cityscape, we're exploring the history and impact of all three New York City staples.

Direct download: cs02232013.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

You might be familiar with the names Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux -- they're the creators of Central Park. But, have you ever heard of John Randel Jr.? This often unrecognized 19th century genius also played an instrumental role in the development of the New York City we know and love today. Learn all about the guy who plotted Manhattan's famous street grid on this week's Cityscape. We'll also talk with a modern-day surveyor in New York City.

Direct download: cs02162013.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Valentine’s Day -- the holiday celebrating love and friendship – is this Thursday.  But, what is it that attracts people to one another?  Relationship experts often say it comes down to having good chemistry. 

This week we talk with author Leil Lowndes about her book on chemistry in relationships, as well as chemistry from entirely different perspectives. We're joined by Doctor Robert Lefkowitz, a professor at Duke University Medical Center and a winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. We also visit Willner Chemists, a nutritional store that has been around for over 100 years.

Direct download: cs02092013.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Spring is still a ways away -- meaning many more days of potentially cold weather. But, instead of complaining about it, we’re doing something about it. We’re devoting this half-hour of Cityscape to thinking warm. We'll warm up with segments on knitting, quilting, hot chocolate and hot yoga.

Direct download: CS02022013.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Each week Cityscape explores the people, places and spirit of New York City in new and unique ways. We journey to fascinating places and meet interesting people, but we wouldn’t be able to do that without support from listeners who appreciate this kind of programming. On this week's edition of Cityscape, we're revisiting some of our favorite segments while asking for your support. Segments include an interview with the woman who runs the troll museum on Manhattan's Lower East Side, an in-studio performance from The New York Holiday Singers, and a look into the city's beer history and culture. **DISCLAIMER** This show was recorded to air on December 15, 2012, but in light of the deadly shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, our fund drive was postponed.

Direct download: cs01262013.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

If you could go back to the time before the sprawling skyscrapers of today’s New York City, you’d find a different city, full of horse drawn carriages and men in hats and dark suits. In other cases you’d see that some parts of the city haven’t changed much at all. An architectural photographer recreated scenes from turn of the century photos by climbing, flying and leaning over precarious structures to capture images from the same spot as his earlier counterparts. He presents the old and new photos side by side in a book called New York Then and Now. Evan Joseph is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs01192013.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

A lot of progress has been made over the years to reduce health disparities in New York City, but substantial inequalities remain among New Yorkers of different economic, racial and ethnic groups. On this week's Cityscape, we’re taking a closer look at health issues facing New York City’s immigrant communities.

Direct download: cs01122013.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

New York City’s filled with people of all shapes, sizes, ethnicities and backgrounds. Many are born and bred here. Others move to the big city to fulfill their dreams. Former Mayor Ed Koch once said you’re a true New Yorker after living in the Big Apple for at least 10 years. But, nevertheless, battles sometimes erupt over when you can say you’re from New York despite your place of origin. This week we’re hearing from a born and bred New Yorker, a transplant, and a writer who lived in New York City, left and isn’t looking back.

Direct download: CS12292012.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EDT



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