Think back on some of your most impactful “firsts” in life -- a first love, a first big career move, a first tragedy.  They are all moments that undoubtedly helped to shape who you are today. On this episode of Cityscape, New York City is the backdrop for life changing firsts, including first loves, first babies and first cancer diagnoses.

Direct download: cs160103.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

On this week’s Cityscape we’re taking a bite into the history of Jewish delis in New York City with the author of a new book called Pastrami on Rye. Because pickles go well with pastrami on rye bread, we’ll pay a visit to the Pickles Guys on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, the only pickle store still on Essex Street, which was once home to a bunch of them. And we’ll top the show off with a little mustard.  We’ll talk with the current owner of A Bauer’s Mustard, a family owned mustard company that opened in New York City in 1888.

Direct download: cs151227.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York is a city that has pretty much everything.  But, taking it all in, well, that could be exhausting, not to mention take a lifetime. Our guests on this edition of Cityscape each have a story about trying to take in some of the “everything” the Big Apple has to offer.  We’ll hear from a guy on a mission to draw every person in New York City, a college professor who walked every block in the Big Apple, and a man who set out to try every slice of regular pizza in Manhattan.

Direct download: cs151220.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal has been called many things over the years. A cesspool, an industrial dumping ground, a blemish. But, our guest on this edition of Cityscape says the 1.8 mile canal is also one of the most important waterways in the history of New York Harbor. Joseph Alexiou is a licensed New York City tour guide, and the author of Gowanus: Brooklyn’s Curious Canal

Direct download: cs151213.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Homelessness is on the rise in New York City. According to a recent report from the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, homelessness is up 11% from 2014. The survey found 75,323 people living on the streets or in shelters in the Big Apple. Mayor de Blasio has been taking a lot of heat for his handling of the homeless situation. But, he recently unveiled a $2.6 plan to help tackle the problem. The 15-year plan would create 15,000 units of housing that would include social services for veterans, mentally disabled people and others in need of assistance. On this edition of Cityscape, we’ll explore other efforts to help combat homelessness in the city, including Councilman Mark Levine’s push to stem evictions, and a program that uses running to combat homelessness.

Direct download: cs151206.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

This is an especially busy time of year in New York City.  Tourists typically come to the Big Apple in droves during the holiday season.  And with all of those out-of-towners comes the opportunity for con artists and hustlers to make some easy money. Our guests on this edition of Cityscape spent years with con artists to uncover their secrets. Trevor B. Milton is an assistant professor in social sciences at Queensborough Community College, and Terry Williams is a professor of sociology at the New School for Social Research.  Trevor and Terry join us to talk about their new book The Con Men: Hustling in New York City.

Direct download: cs151129.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

In the blink of an eye the holiday season is upon us once again. And for a lot of people that will mean more time in the kitchen cooking and baking for family and friends. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re focusing our attention on food, and to some extent, the preparation of it. We'll visit the Museum of Food and Drink in Brooklyn, where some of the exhibits, are, in fact, edible.  We'll also talk with famed food photographer Alan "Battman" Batt who has established a school to train line cooks in New York City.  The school educates unemployed people and places them in restaurants. It's free of charge to students. And we'll check in with Brooklyn resident and classically trained chef Jackie Newgent about her book The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook.

Direct download: cs151122.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Every day millions of people get to and from their destinations using the New York City subway system. A lot of them are too rushed to take notice of their surroundings. But, not Adam Chang. The freelance art director and designer has been taking the time to uncover the subway’s hidden treasures for his NY Train Project. Adam is cataloging the signs of subway stations on his website. He'll join us on this week's Cityscape to talk about the project. We'll also hear from the author of The Routes Not Taken: A Trip Through New York City’s Unbuilt Subway System, as well as talk with a busker who plays the saw at the Times Square, Union Square and Herald Square subway stations.

Direct download: CS151114.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:00am EST

Each quarter, WFUV works to raise awareness of a particular issue through our Strike a Chord campaign. Past campaigns have focused on everything from mental illness stereotypes to teen suicide prevention. WFUV and Bronxnet Television teamed up to produce a special panel discussion for our latest campaign focused on family caregivers. When you’re faced with having to care for a sick or disabled loved one, you’re bound to encounter a set of new responsibilities – many of which might be unfamiliar or intimidating. Our panel discussion on the subject features the following guests: 
Randi Kaplan, Director Caregiver Support Program Montefiore Health System
Chris Widelo, Associate State Director for AARP New York
Matt Kudish, Senior Vice President of Caregiver Services at Alzheimer’s Association, New York City chapter
Sharon Corso, a caregiver for her husband who has Alzheimer’s Disease

Direct download: cs151107.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Central Park has long been a magnet for New Yorkers and tourists alike. Some people are drawn to it because of the peace and quiet it can provide in the often obnoxiously loud city. Others are attracted to its ballfields.  And if you’re a runner, you may appreciate both its hilly and flat terrain. Since its inception, artists have also felt the tug of Central Park. Roger F. Pasquier has put together a book that explores how artists have depicted the park in their work dating back to the mid 1800s. Roger studied art history at Columbia and the University of California, Berkley.  He retired from his career as an ornithologist a few years ago, which freed him up to focus on his book, titled Painting Central Park. Roger is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs151101.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Women have played a wide variety of roles during wartime. During World War I, their main role was to work in munitions factories, on farms and other areas to replace men drafted into the military. But, as the years progressed, women got more and more involved in war efforts, including serving as journalists covering the combat. On this week’s Cityscape, we’ll talk with a New York City resident who’s penned a novel that explores the role of female journalists on the battleground and in the newsroom during the Vietnam War.  We'll also attend a retreat that takes an unusual approach to helping female veterans cope with PTSD.

Direct download: cs151025.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

From landmark buildings like City Hall to hidden gems like New York Marble Cemetery in Manhattan’s East Village neighborhood, New York is a city of endless discoveries. For one weekend each year, the organization OHNY, which stands for Open House New York, invites the public to explore hundreds of New York City’s most impressive sites. On this week's Cityscape we're talking with OHNY Executive Director Gregory Wessner, as well as checking out a couple of sites featured in this year's OHNY weekend.

Direct download: cs151018.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

One could argue that no food item is more New York than the bagel. For a lot of people buying bagels on a Sunday morning is a ritual. But, let’s face it, New York City is a great place to grab a bagel any day of the week. The city is home to a wide variety of places to get a bagel fix. On this edition of Cityscape, we're taking a bite into the history and culture of the bagel in New York City.

Direct download: cs151011.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:30am EST

You can see a lot of New York City from the top of a double-decker bus. But, outside views of the Empire State Building and the Metropolitan Museum of Art are limiting. If you never venture inside these kinds of iconic places you’ll miss out on some pretty spectacular interiors. A new book encourages readers to look beyond buildings’ facades.  It’s called Interior Landmarks: Treasures of New York. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with the book's authors, Judith Gura and Kate Wood.

Direct download: cs151004.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City will soon be among the places where people can acquire medical marijuana with a prescription. The city’s first marijuana dispensary is scheduled to open in January near Manhattan’s Union Square. Under a law signed by Governor Cuomo in June 2014, five companies will be allowed to grow cannabis and operate 20 dispensaries throughout New York State. Many have slammed the legislation as being the most restrictive in the country. On this edition of Cityscape, we're exploring the issue of medical marijuana in New York.

Direct download: cs150927.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Are Libraries Still Relevant?

In the age of e-books and digital information, are libraries still relevant? The answer is a resounding yes if you ask Michael D.D. White and Carolyn McIntyre. The Brooklyn residents are the founders of the group Citizens Defending Libraries. They're our guests on this week's Cityscape, along with the author of a new book about an especially fierce battle against a project that would have demolished the beloved stacks at the main branch of the New York Public Library on 5th Avenue at 42nd Street in Manhattan. We'll also dive into the history of the marble lions that stand guard outside what's officially known as The Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. 

Direct download: cs150919.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

As summer comes to a close, it’s likely that orders of cold beers will turn into orders of hot toddy’s. But regardless of your drink of choice, there are no shortage of places in New York City to throw one back. On this edition of Cityscape, we’ll delve into the history of some of New York City’s most noteworthy bars, and talk with a local bartender who holds the Guinness Record as the world’s fastest.

Direct download: cs150912.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is constantly evolving -- both above ground and underground. On this edition of Cityscape, we’ll hear about efforts to construct what’s billed as the world’s first underground park in an abandoned trolley terminal on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, as well as other efforts to re-invent under-utilized spaces in the Big Apple. We'll also delve into a little bit of history, or rather mystery. Are there cow tunnels under the streets of New York City?  Yes – cows as in "moo."

Direct download: cs150905.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Samuel Battle is far from a household name in New York City, yet he holds a very important place in the Big Apple’s history. Battle was the first African-American to join the NYPD. But, the road to becoming a police officer was not an easy one for Battle, and even after he got on the force, the challenges continued. He had to deal with racist colleagues, death threats and government corruption, along with criminals and gang members. A new book traces Samuel Battle’s amazing journey. It’s called One Righteous Man: Samuel Battle and the Shattering of the Color Line in New York. The author is New York Daily News Editorial Page Editor, Arthur Browne. Browne joins us on this edition of Cityscape.

Samuel Battle is far from a household name in New York City yet he holds a very important place in the Big Apple’s history. Battle was the first African-American to join the NYPD. But, the road to becoming a police officer was not an easy one for Battle, and even after he got on the force, the challenges continued. He had to deal with racist colleagues, death threats and government corruption, along with criminals and gang members. A new book traces Samuel Battle’s amazing journey. It’s called One Righteous Man: Samuel Battle and the Shattering of the Color Line in New York. The author is Daily News Editorial Page Editor Arthur Browne. He's our guest on this edition of Cityscape. - See more at: http://www.wfuv.org/content/cityscape-one-righteous-man#sthash.ZCjasNoD.dpuf
Samuel Battle is far from a household name in New York City yet he holds a very important place in the Big Apple’s history. Battle was the first African-American to join the NYPD. But, the road to becoming a police officer was not an easy one for Battle, and even after he got on the force, the challenges continued. He had to deal with racist colleagues, death threats and government corruption, along with criminals and gang members. A new book traces Samuel Battle’s amazing journey. It’s called One Righteous Man: Samuel Battle and the Shattering of the Color Line in New York. The author is Daily News Editorial Page Editor Arthur Browne. He's our guest on this edition of Cityscape. - See more at: http://www.wfuv.org/content/cityscape-one-righteous-man#sthash.ZCjasNoD.dpuf
Direct download: cs150829.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is home to a wide variety of clubs where you can mix and mingle with people with similar interests and backgrounds, some more exclusive than others. In fact, the city has a rich history of elite social clubs dating back to the 1830s.  On this edition of Cityscape, we're exploring that history and taking a peek inside a couple of clubs that have been around for quite some time. 

Direct download: cs150822copy.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Out of all five boroughs in New York City, the Bronx is often not the first that comes to mind for visitors to the Big Apple.  Manhattan is typically the big draw.  With places like the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty getting a whole lot of love.  But, the Bronx has a lot to offer tourists and locals alike. A new guidebook spotlights a wide variety of cultural and historical attractions in the Bronx.  It’s called The Bronx: The Ultimate Guide to New York City's Beautiful Borough, and it’s written by Bronx Borough Historian and Fairleigh Dickinson University History Professor, Lloyd Ultan and former University Professor Shelley Olson. Lloyd and Shelley are our guests on this edition of Cityscape.

Direct download: cs150815.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

When it comes to Bourbon, Brooklyn resident Reid Mitenbuler is giving it to us straight. Mitenbuler’s written a book about Bourbon.  Its called Bourbon Empire: The Past and Future of America’s Whiskey. Mitenbuler is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs150808.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:52pm EST

Brooklyn wasn’t always a borough known for art and culture. But, today it’s bursting with it. Brooklynites are doing a wide range of interesting things in some pretty interesting places. Just ask Oriana Leckert.  She writes about this kind of stuff on her blog called Brooklyn Spaces. Oriana also just published a book by the same name. She joins us on this edition of Cityscape to talk all about what she calls Brooklyn's "hubs of culture and creativity."

 

Direct download: cs150801.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Jerome Charyn is an award-winning American author who’s published nearly 50 books. Throughout his career, he’s written novels, memoirs, graphic novels, short stories, plays and non-fiction works. Born and raised in the Bronx, Jerome hasn’t forgotten his roots. The Bronx consistently seeps into his writing. His latest work is a collection of thirteen stories called Bitter Bronx. Jerome is our guest on this edition of Cityscape.

Direct download: cs150725.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

For the first time in decades pedestrians and bicyclists can now travel over New York City’s oldest standing bridge.  The High Bridge, connecting Washington Heights in Manhattan to Highbridge in the Bronx, re-opened to the public last month after being closed for more than 40 years. A new children’s book aims to educate kids about the High Bridge.  It’s called The Lowdown on the High Bridge: The Story of How New York City Got Its Water.  It’s written by none other than Sonia Manzano, best known as Maria from Sesame Street.  Manzano grew up in the Bronx.  She is our guest on this edition of Cityscape.

Direct download: cs150718.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is dotted with coffee shops. They’re pretty much on every block. Some streets might even have two or three. Each and every morning people line up to get their java fix before heading off to work or school. On this edition of Cityscape we’re exploring a bit of the New York coffee scene. But we’ll have something for tea drinkers too.

 

Direct download: cs150411c.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

A lot of us associate Independence with America’s independence from British rule, but there are plenty of ways to look at it. On this week’s edition of Cityscape, we’re looking at independence from various perspectives, including a kid’s independence from the diaper. We’ll also talk with the executive director of an organization that works to help disabled New Yorkers live as independently as possible. We’ll learn about the famous Macy’s 4thof July Fireworks from its creative director. And we’ll delve into New York City’s Revolutionary War history with a tour guide who knows all about it. 

Direct download: cs150704.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:00am EST

WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign is shining a spotlight on kids who care.

The campaign highlights kids making a difference in their communities through volunteer efforts.

We produced this panel discussion in conjunction with BronxNet Television.  Our guests include: 8-year-old Maeve Ryan who is involved with a project called Operation Christmas Child; 15-year-old Sean Martin, the founder of Kids Adopt a Shelter; and Naomi Hirabayashi with DoSomething.org.

Direct download: cs150627.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Baseball took his sight, but gave him a life.  That’s what Ed Lucas says about the sport in a book he penned with his son, Christopher, called Seeing Home: The Ed Lucas Story -- A Blind Broadcaster’s Story of Overcoming Life’s Greatest Obstacles. Ed Lucas might not be as familiar a name in baseball history as Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio, but his story is no less remarkable.  Ed and his son Christopher are our guests on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs150620.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Red Hook, Brooklyn is one of those New York City neighborhoods that might fall under the radar. It’s a waterfront community that’s a more than 20-minute walk from the nearest subway station. Some people might only know it because it's home to an IKEA. But, there's a lot more than a popular furniture store to explore in Red Hook. On this week's edition of Cityscape, we're spending time in Red Hook.

Direct download: cs150613.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

When you think of cats in New York City – what comes to mind? For some people, it might the Broadway show Cats. But, the Big Apple is home to a lot of real-life felines. According the New York City Economic Development Corporation, 500,000 cats live in the city as pets. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking all about cats.  Our guests include the creator of the Felines of New York blog;a co-founder of a so-called cat cafe on Manhattan's Lower East Side known as Meow Parlour; and someone who knows all about the big cats at the Bronx Zoo.

Direct download: cs150606.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Imagine a skyscraper in place of Grand Central Terminal, or construction crews gutting the interior of the famed Radio City Music Hall.  It’s been five decades since New York City Mayor Robert Wagner signed a measure to help preserve the city’s history.  A new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York explores the roots and impact of the city’s landmarks law.  It’s called Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks.  The exhibit is complemented by a book of the same name.  The guys behind both are Donald Albrecht, the Museum of the City of New York’s Curator for Architecture and Design and Andrew Dolkart, the Director of Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University.  They’re our guests on this edition of Cityscape. 

 

Direct download: cs150530.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00pm EST

A lot of people who visit New York hit up the Bronx or Central Park zoos to get an up-close look at wildlife. After all, the only wild animals the city is most known for are rats and pigeons. But, the fact of the matter is the city is teaming with wildlife. On this week's Cityscape, we’re exploring wildlife in the concrete jungle – from spotted salamanders to parrots. 

Direct download: cs150523.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

It's become an all too familiar story for a lot of New Yorkers.  Their favorite dive bar or cafe is turned into a 7-Eleven or Apple Store.  On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with folks about the plight of mom and pop shops in an increasingly corporate retail environment.

Direct download: cs150516.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

How about a side of crickets with that burger?  Might sound uninviting here in the United States.  But, eating insects is common to cultures in many parts of the world. On this week's Cityscape we’ll delve deeper into the idea of insect-eating and its potential benefits for the planet.  Our guests include Lou Sorkin, an entomologist at the Museum of Natural History and David George Gordon, the author of the Eat-A-Bug Cookbook.  We'll also talk with a researcher who studied what ants are eating in the Big Apple, and found some of them have a penchant for junk food.

Direct download: cs150509.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST

Spring is in the air in New York City.  And after a long, cold winter, it’s finally safe to give some serious consideration to spending time on the water. And while sometimes it’s easy to forget, the Big Apple is surrounded by H2O.  On this week's Cityscape, we're visiting the last wooden barge in New York Harbor, and checking out the sailing scene on City Island. 

 

Direct download: cs150502.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Unique Fitness

The clock is ticking toward summer. And for a lot of people you know what that means -- there are only a couple of months left to get in shape for the beach.

Now that the countdown to summer is on, we’re devoting this episode of Cityscape to fitness.  We’ll check out an exercise class in Manhattan that gets you on a surfboard -- no wetsuit required.  We’ll also visit an exercise class that gets you in the air, think Cirque du Soleil, and another fitness class that involves trampolines.  We’ll also talk with New York City fitness expert Marc Perry for advice on getting in shape.

Direct download: cs150425.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST

It's a "best of" show this week for WFUV's spring membership drive.  We'll learn about some of the most iconic New Yorkers of all time, delve into the history of the knish, chomp into New York City pretzels, go sailing in New York Harbor, and much more.  Join us and do your part for member-supported, commercial-free WFUV!

Direct download: csdrive41815.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

When you think of Art Deco what comes to mind?  For some people it’s South Beach in Miami. But, right under our noses here in New York City is an amazing array of Art Deco architecture -- from the Chrysler Building to apartment buildings along the Bronx’s Grand Concourse. This week we’re looking at Art Deco up high and down low -- from skyscrapers to the mailboxes in their lobbies.

Direct download: cs150411.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is a place of endless discoveries. There’s so much to see and do here. But, some places, you’ll never find on a tourist map. On this week's Cityscape, we’re talking with a couple of guys who’ve ventured to places that show a side of New York City that couldn’t be any more different than the glitz and glamor of Times Square. Both gentlemen have new books out that take us beyond restricted access and no trespass signs. Matthew Litwack is a co-author of a book that shines a light on a graffiti art scene that exists in a dark and gritty place – the city’s underground. The book is called Beneath the Streets: The Hidden Relics of New York’s Subway System. Photographer Will Ellis spent three years exploring the city’s abandoned places, including decaying asylums and hospitals.  He first posted his images on a blog called Abandoned NYC, but now he also has a book of the same name.

Direct download: cs150404.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Each and every day we touch and eat things often without giving it a second thought.  We hold on to the handrail walking down the stairs to catch a subway train.  We top a cup of pudding with a little cool whip.  

On this edition of Cityscape, we’re talking with folks who’ve actually given a lot of thought to what we touch and eat -- from subway turnstiles to spray cheese. 

The show features:

  • Chris Mason, a geneticist at the Weill Cornell Medical Center.  He and a team of research assistants collected DNA throughout the New York City subway system to identify germs. 
  • Writer Patrick DiJusto took a good hard look at what’s inside everyday products.  His new book is called This is What You Just Put in Your Mouth?: From Egg Nog to Beef Jerky, the Surprising Secrets of What's Inside Everyday Products.
Direct download: cs2150328.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

What do Al Pacino, Regis Philbin, Mary Higgins Clark and Colin Powell all have in common? They're all Bronx natives.  And all of them are featured in a new book called Just Kids from the Bronx: Telling it the Way it Was: An Oral History.  The book includes the stories of more than 60 native Bronxites who have gone on to make important contributions in nearly every field imaginable, from acting to science to athletics.  Author Arlene Alda, who happens to be the wife of television and film star Alan Alda, is our guest on this edition of Cityscape.

Direct download: cs150321.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York-style pizza tops “best of” lists across the web. A google search turns up images of mostly big, hearty cheese slices.  The kind of photos that make your mouth water.  Pizza has a long history in the Big Apple.  In fact, Lombardi's in Manhattan is said to be the first pizzeria in America.  Brooklyn resident Scott Weiner is an expert on all things pizza.  He turned his love for the food into a career. Scott runs tours of significant pizzerias in New York City.  We recently visited with him at his apartment in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, where he keeps a super large collection of pizza boxes.  You'll hear that interview on this week's Cityscape.  Also on this week's show, we'll visit a pizza school on Manhattan's Lower East Side, and talk with a co-owner of a Staten Island pizza joint that's been around since 1937.

Direct download: cs150314.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

This coming July marks the 25th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  But, just how far have we come in securing equal access and equal opportunity for all, and what more needs to be done?

As part of WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign focused on efforts to improve accessibility for people with disabilities, we teamed up with Bronxnet for a special panel discussion.

Our guests included:

James Weisman.  James is an ADA pioneer and civil rights advocate.  He’s been involved in the disability rights movement since the beginning.  James currently serves as the Executive Vice President and General Counsel of United Spinal Association.

Edith Prentiss, chair of the Taxis for All Campaign.

And...

Miranda Appelbaum.  Miranda is Senior Manager of Accessibility and Visitor Services at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.  She’s also the chair of the steering committee for the Museum Access Consortium.  The Consortium works to improve access to cultural resources throughout New York City, including museums and botanical gardens.

Direct download: cs150307.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Since spring won’t officially arrive until March 20th, and we’re bound to still have some cold days to contend with, we’ve decided to do a show focused on bringing the outdoors indoors, where it’s still warm and cozy.  We’ll pay a visit to the New York Earth Room, a SoHo loft filled with 280,000 pounds of dirt, get our hands dirty with the owner of a plant store in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn who will give us tips on how best to grow and care for indoor plants, and meet a commercial taxidermist in Middle Village, Queens. 

Direct download: CS150228.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The New York City accent is distinct and unmistakable.  From James Cagney to Woody Allen to Rosie Perez, you know they’re from New York as soon as they open their mouths.  On this week’s Cityscape, we’ll talk with a filmmaker who made a documentary that tells the story of the New York City accent. We'll also take you to an accent slam where New Yorkers competed for the best New York City accent, and we'll talk with an accent-elimination coach who helps people rid themselves of their "fuhgettaboutits."

Direct download: cs150221.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Saturday is Valentine’s Day and love might be in the air.  But, why is it that we fall in love in the first place?  On this week's Cityscape, renowned anthropologist and love expert Helen Fisher talks about the science of falling in love. We'll also hear from a couple of dating coaches about how they help people find love in the Big Apple, a German-born photographer will join us to talk about his love affair with New York City, and we’ll find out why business is coming up roses for florists courting millennials.

Direct download: cs150214.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST

New York City resident Coss Marte went from being a drug kingpin to a fitness entrepreneur. While serving time in prison he lost 70 pounds thanks to an exercise routine he worked up in his cell. Marte is now out from behind bars and operating a fitness bootcamp in Manhattan based on his prison workout routine.  Marte joins us on this week's Cityscape to talk about he how reinvented himself.

Direct download: cs150207.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

In New York City everything is at your finger tips. With so many options for food, music, and culture, it can sometimes feel overwhelming. But instead of taking the classic New Yorker approach by kvetching, this week, we’re settling down to dig into a classic Yiddish tradition: the knish.  Our guest is Laura Silver, author of Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food. We'll also pay a visit to the famed Yonah Schimmel Knish Bakery on Manhattan's Lower East Side.

Direct download: CS150131.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

On this week's Cityscape, we're revisiting some of our favorite segments related to cooking and baking as part of WFUV's winter membership drive.  We'll revisit our interview with the makers of the legendary baked goods at Levain Bakery in Manhattan, as well as head back to the iconic Peter Pan Donut and Pastry Shop in Brooklyn.  We'll also make other stops as we ask you to do your part for member-supported, commercial-free WFUV.

Direct download: cs150124.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST

New York City is often considered a cultural hub. It’s known for its music, fashion, and food.  The city and its five boroughs are a blend of international flavors.  This week we’re travelling to Queens -- a borough that’s been heralded as the most multicultural place on Earth.  Our guest is Adrienne Onofri.  She’s a tour guide and the author of a new book that features 30 walking tours. It’s called Walking Queens.

Direct download: cs150117.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST

Once upon a time New York’s garment district employed hundreds of thousands of workers, and produced most of the clothing made in the United States.  But, thanks to outsourcing and technological advances, the district is now just a shadow of what it once was.  Our guest on this edition of Cityscape has fond memories of the garment district’s heyday.  Leonard Bernstein’s family founded a children’s wear business in 1928.  He took over the company in 1953.  Bernstein’s children now run the business, but the Brooklyn native says he can still hear the hum of sewing machines in his head.  Bernstein is now a published author.  He’s written six books, including a collection of short stories in which he draws a lot from his experiences in the garment district.  The collection is called Death By Pastrami.

Direct download: cs150110final.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST

Cityscape: A New York City Bucket List for the New Year

The ball just dropped in Times Square, and you know what that means.  It’s time to make and stick to a new round of New Year’s resolutions. A lot of people promise themselves that they’ll kick bad habits, like smoking, or perhaps spend more time at the gym.  But, what about resolving to explore places you haven’t been before?

To kick off 2015, this week we’re bringing you a New York City bucket list. Our guest is James Heidenry, author of 100 Things to Do in New York City Before You Die.

Direct download: cs150103.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:30am EST



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