From Facebook to Instagram to Pinterest, social media sites are chock full of images and videos of cats. For a lot of people, their feline companions are their best friends, as independent as they may be. On this week’s Cityscape, how one New York City non-profit works to find homeless cats and kittens permanent, loving homes. Also, the story of how a lost cat re-defined life for a homeless man in Portland, Oregon. We'll talk with Britt Collins, author of Strays: A Lost Cat, A Homeless Man, and Their Journey Across America.

Direct download: cs180114.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The Bronx is booming with development. New housing projects are sprouting up across the borough. But, in the midst of this change, you'll find remnants of the past that have stood the test of time. On this week's Cityscape, we're exploring two of the most historic homes in the Bronx -- the Van Cortlandt House and Poe Cottage.

Direct download: cs171224.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Classrooms today look a lot different than they did even just 10 years ago. Smart boards have replaced chalkboards, and kids are more likely to use computers than spiral notebooks to take notes. Yet the importance of those in front of the classroom has remained constant. On this week's Cityscape, we're sitting down with Lynette Guastaferro, executive director of Teaching Matters. The organization works to make sure teachers in New York City public schools have the skills and tools they need to succeed in the classroom and drive school-wide improvement.

Direct download: cs171217.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Every year more than 44,000 Americans die by suicide. On average, that's 121 suicides a day. That's according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing in on efforts to prevent suicide.

Direct download: cs171210.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Drug addiction can tear families apart. And it's something that knows no boundaries. The disease has reached epidemic levels across the United States. Join us for a special panel discussion on the issue produced at BronxNet Television, including:

  • Doctor Melissa Stein, medical director of Montefiore's Division of Subtance Abuse
  • Blain Namm with the non-profit organization Road Recovery
  • Eve Goldberg, the founder of Big Vision Foundation
Direct download: cs171203.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

For people getting out of prison, the road to stability can be a daunting one. When you have a criminal record, it can be especially challenging to find a job. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with the folks behind A Secon "U" Foundation. They work to help the formerly incarcerated find employment in the fitness industry.

Direct download: CS171126.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Music is much more than a form of entertainment. It can help people through a variety of life's challenges, including physical and mental illness. But, it can also have an impact in the classroom. On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with the folks behind Education Through Music, a program that works with inner city schools in New York City.

Direct download: cs171119.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

“Everything is beautiful at the ballet." At least that’s what they say in the Broadway musical, A Chorus Line. On this week’s Cityscape, we chassé into the world of ballet. We’ll be talking with Mary Helen Bowers, a former New York City Ballet dancer turned fitness guru who founded the Ballet Beautiful program. We're also talking with Marc Happel, the director of the New York City Ballet costume shop. 

Direct download: cs171112.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

For some, the end of daylight saving time doesn't require a lot of attention. Their smartphone or computer automatically rolls back the time. But, for others, it requires a manual rewind. On this week's Cityscape, we're being mindful of the time -- the time kept on wrists, and the time kept in pockets, although that's much less common in today's digital age. Our guest is Nicholas Manousos, president of the Horological Society of New York and co-founder of Firehouse Horology.

Direct download: cs171105.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is layered in history. Behind every brownstone, or gravestone for that matter, is a story. A story about lives lived and lost, some tragically or under other macabre circumstances. That’s where Andrea James comes in. Andrea is the founder of Boroughs of the Dead Macabre: New York City Walking Tours. She knows all about the horror and scandals that haunt New York City’s past. Just in time for Halloween, Andrea is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs171029.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

In a place that appears larger than life, it’s hard to imagine New York City could ever be shrunken down. But, perhaps you haven’t yet paid a visit to Gulliver’s Gate.  The exhibition brings the entire planet, including the Big Apple, to West 44th Street in miniature form. On this week’s show we’re talking with Jason Hackett, the Chief Marketing Officer of Gulliver’s Gate. We’ll also meet a man who spends his life in a land of miniatures.  Darren Thomas Scala is the owner of D. Thomas Fine Miniatures. He has great enthusiasm for and deep knowledge of miniature arts.

Direct download: cs171022.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The United Nations General Assembly wrapped up its 72nd annual general debate late last month. Many New Yorkers are familiar with the annual event, if for no other reason, because it causes week-long traffic tie-ups. But, the UN and New York City have a long history together, one that involves much more than congested roadways. Our guest this week is Pamela Hanlon. She’s the author of A Wordly Affair: New York, the United Nations and the Story Behind Their Unlikely Bond.

Direct download: CS171015.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

What do legendary jazz musician Duke Ellington, suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Herman Melville have in common? They’re all buried in the same Bronx cemetery. Where did we get that fun fact? From a man with encyclopedic knowledge of the Bronx. Llyod Ultan is the Bronx Borough historian. He's our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs170108n.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

A museum in Brooklyn is trying to fill a void when it comes to telling the story of the Holocaust. Instead of focusing on death, the Amud Aish Memorial Museum places an emphasis on Jewish religious life. On this week's Cityscape we're joined by the museum's Director of Research and Archives, Rabbi Dovid Reidel. He'll tell us about how his family history informed his career, and the new information the museum is bringing to light.

Direct download: cs171001.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

When it comes to wild animals, chances are a lot of people don’t associate them with cities like New York. That is unless you count pigeons, rats and squirrels. But, look closer and you’ll discover a wide variety of untamed creatures in the Big Apple, from coyotes to opossums to skunks. On this week’s Cityscape, we’ll talk with a woman who helps to rehabilitate injured, sick and orphaned wild animals in the city. Also this week, New York City is home to tens of thousands of feral and stray cats. The New York City Feral Cat Initiative works to reduce the population with an approach known as TNR – trap, neuter, return. We'll talk with the group's director of TNR Education.

Direct download: cs170924.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

If you’re in the mood for sausage and peppers or a cannoli, there’s no better time to be in New York City. The San Gennaro Feast has taken over the streets of Manhattan’s Little Italy. The annual event has a long history in the neighborhood. In fact, it’s now in its 91st year. The San Gennaro festival runs through September 24th. On this week's Cityscape we're delving into the history of Little Italy and the San Gennaro Feast.

Direct download: cs170917.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Tracing your family history is as simple as ever thanks to genealogy websites and DNA ancestry test kits. For Brooklyn resident Andrew Van Dusen, the roots of his family tree were uncovered through a middle school class project. Van Dusen discovered that he was a 12th generation descendant of one of Manhattan’s first few hundred settlers. He's our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs170910.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

If you’re headed to a Labor Day weekend gathering, chances are someone will be serving hot dogs. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council estimates that Americans eat 20 billion hot dogs a year. The Council says over a third of hot dogs are consumed between Memorial Day and Labor Day. As peak hot dog eating season comes to an end, we bring you an episode devoted to the hot dog, or as it was sometimes referred to in the 1920s, the frankfurter sandwich.

Direct download: cs170903.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

With the summer quickly coming to a close, a lot of folks are looking to squeeze in at least one more trip to the beach. New York City is home to some pretty nice beach destinations. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re taking in the sand, surf, history and culture of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn. If you’re unfamiliar with Brighton Beach chances are you know its neighbor, Coney Island. But, like Coney, Brighton Beach also has distinct character all its own, and is often referred to as “Little Russia” for its large population of Russian immigrants.
 

Direct download: cs170827.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Just in time for the back-to-school season, a new novel is out about the trials and tribulations of being the class mom. The book is actually titled Class Mom. On this week's Cityscape, author Laurie Gelman joins us to talk about what inspired her to write a novel about a year in the life of a kindergarten class mom. Laurie is married to Michael Gelman, executive producer of “Live! With Kelly and Ryan." She has two kids and lives in Manhattan. We'll also hear a touching tale of motherhood from Meredith Fein Lichtenberg,  a board certified lactation consultant, parenting educator and non-fiction writer in Manhattan.

Direct download: cs170820.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

In a city like New York, new, trendy restaurants and shops open all the time. Sometimes all it takes is a photo of a delectable dish on Instagram to make an eatery a sensation. But, sometimes establishments are not celebrated for what's new, but for what's old. On this week's Cityscape, we're in for a sweet treat. And we mean that literally! We're going inside two establishments that have stood the test of time -- The Lexington Candy Shop, that's been in business for 92 years, and Economy Candy on the Lower East Side, which opened in 1937.

Direct download: cs170813.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

It’s a common scene in New York City – people hurrying down the sidewalk, many staring at their smartphones. But, while they’re looking down, architect Robert Arthur King is looking up. King specifically likes to take photographs of decorative stone carvings on the facades of buildings – faces, animal figures, flowers. These are sculptures mostly created by anonymous artisans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  King’s photographs of these sculptures are featured in 3 books – Faces in Stone, Animals in Stone and his latest, Figures in Stone. King is our guest on this week's Cityscape, along with New York City stone carver, Chris Pellettieri.

Direct download: cs170806.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is a place of endless discoveries. But, sometimes it’s nice to escape the concrete jungle for greener pastures. On this week’s show, we’re heading north – roughly 30 miles north of Manhattan to be exact. We're visiting Kykuit, otherwise known as the John D. Rockefeller Estate in Sleepy Hollow. Its views are spectacular and its history is rich. We talked with two individuals with great knowledge of and appreciation for the property: Kykuit’s Curator Cynthia Altman and Larry Lederman, a photographer who’s out with a new book featuring magnificent images of the estate. It’s called The Rockefeller Family Gardens: An American Legacy.
 

 
File
Direct download: cs170730.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

You might not be familiar with his name, but you may have marveled at one of the many projects he’s been involved with. Leslie Earl Robertson is an American engineer who helped to create some of the most innovative and daring buildings of the modern era. Robertson was the lead structural engineer of the Twin Towers of the original World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan.  He worked on that project with architect Minoru Yamasaki. Yamasaki was just one of many internationally renowned architects Robertson got to work with. Robertson writes about his storied career in a new book called The Structure of Design: An Engineer’s Extraordinary Life in Architecture. He joins us in the studio this week to talk about it.

Direct download: cs170723.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City wants to close Rikers Island within the next 10 years. The plan involves an effort to reduce the inmate population so the city can open small jails to replace the massive complex. One way the city is looking to reduce recidivism is through a "jails to jobs" initiative. But, getting a job isn’t always easy for someone who has spent time behind bars. Employers can be reluctant to hire someone with a criminal record. And ex-offenders with visible tattoos can face an especially hard time securing work. Enter Dr. David Ores who practices on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. He runs a program that removes visible gang and prison tattoos for free. On this week's Cityscape, we talk with Dr. Ores about his Fresh Start initiative, as well as with Stanley Richards, Executive Vice President of the Fortune Society.

Direct download: cs170716.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Anyone with an appreciation for Broadway might vividly remember their first show. On this week's Cityscape we're talking with a guy whose childhood was defined by Broadway. Between the ages of 11 and 16, Ron Fassler saw more than 200 Broadway shows. He reflects on his days of frequenting the Great White Way as a youth in a new book called Up in the Cheap Seats: A Historical Memoir of Broadway.

Direct download: cs170709.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Studies show that healthy children get better grades, attend school more often and behave better in class. But, many kids face unique barriers to health. We delve into the issue as part of WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign with a distinguished panel of experts:

  • Doctor Peter Sherman, Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center.
  • Doctor Jessica Rieder, Founder and Director of the Bronx Nutrition and Fitness Initiative for Teens (B’N Fit). It's a joint venture between the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore and the Mosholu Montefiore Community Center.
  • Bill Telepan, Executive Chef of Wellenss in the Schools.
Direct download: cs170702.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York City is made up of several islands. The big ones, like Manhattan and Staten Island, need no introduction. Even some of the smaller ones have significant name recognition, like Coney Island and City Island. But, how much do you know about the islands not accessible to the general public? On this week's Cityscape we're exploring a couple of mysterious islands in New York City -- Hart Island and North Brother Island.

Direct download: cs170625.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

I scream, you scream, we all scream, for ice cream -- especially at this time of year. After all, what better way to keep cool than with a vanilla cone or whatever flavor suits your fancy? New York City is home to a wide variety of ice cream shops, including a brand new one that’s serving up frozen treats to the 21 and over crowd. On this week's Cityscape, we're visiting Tipsy Scoop and other hot spots for frozen treats in New York City.

Direct download: cs170618.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Being a 20-something can be exciting. It’s a time in your life when you’re often presented with great opportunities and once in a lifetime adventures. But, what happens when life throws you a major curveball? Our guest this week is Suleika Jaouad. She’s a writer, advocate, public speaker and cancer survivor. Suleika was 22 when she learned she had leukemia. She went on to write about her experiences with cancer in a New York Times column titled Life Interrupted, as well as in other publications.

Direct download: cs170611.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

She was a Hollywood sensation known for her beauty and charisma. She died young -- at the age of 36. But, more than 50 years after her death, Marilyn Monroe is still an icon. Her image can be seen everywhere from t-shirts to coffee mugs. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re focusing on Marilyn’s time -- not in Tinseltown -- but in New York City. Our guest is Elizabeth Winder, the author of Marilyn in Manhattan: Her Year of Joy.

Direct download: cs170604.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The name Norman Bel Geddes is not as commonly known as Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell or Henry Ford. But, Bel Geddes’ designs are reflected in everything from cocktail shakers to radios to kitchen appliances. Bel Geddes may be best known for the massive Futurama exhibit at the 1939 World's Fair in Queens. Alex Szerlip is the author of a new biography of the iconic designer and inventor. It’s called The Man Who Designed the Future: Norman Bel Geddes and the Invention of 20th Century America. Alex is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs170528.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York is one of the most the most photographed cities in the world. Amateur and professional photographers alike have long found inspiration in the Big Apple. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing in on two great photographers in New York City history -- Alice Austen and Todd Webb. Austen was one of the nation’s earliest and most prolific female photographers, and Webb has been called the best mid-century photographer you've never heard of. That’s because he’s not nearly as well known as some of his predecessors and contemporaries, like Edward Weston and Berneice Abbott. A new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York aims to change that. It’s called “A City Seen: Todd Webb’s Postwar New York 1945-1960.”

Direct download: cs170521.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Food has the power to do much more than nourish our bodies. Just the taste of a certain dish can conjure up vivid memories of people and places in our past. Our guest this week is Peter Gethers. He’s an author, screenwriter, playwright, book editor and film and television producer. His latest book pays tribute to his mom, Judy Gethers, who was a celebrated cook and cookbook writer. It’s called My Mother’s Kitchen: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life.

Direct download: cs170514.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Imagine going undercover as a New York City taxi driver. What stories might emerge from your back seat? Our guest this week is French producer and filmmaker Benoit Cohen. Benoit spent months driving a cab to help him research his next movie. Not only is that film now in the works, his experiences behind the wheel of a taxi also spawned a book called Yellow Cab.

Direct download: cs170507.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:30am EST

The Mohegan Indians knew it as Aquehung or "River of High Bluffs." We know it as the Bronx River. The roughly 24-mile river runs deep with history, a history that includes a whole lot of pollution. On this week's Cityscape we're talking with Maggie Scott Greenfield, the Executive Director of the Bronx River Alliance. The organization is committed to protecting, improving and restoring the Bronx River corridor.

Direct download: cs170430.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The American theater has a rich history that stretches from it origins in vaudeville to today’s hit musical Hamilton, with a score rooted in Hip-Hop and Rap. This week, we’re exploring the evolution of American culture -- how we went from a time where sideshow acts were seen alongside fine art, to the emergence of orchestras and art museums, to now, when a gala at the Met is attended by celebrity icons like Beyonce and the Kardashians.

*** Note -- Cityscape producer Zach Zalis is sitting in for George Bodarky as host.

Direct download: cs170423.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

What do names like Ben Franklin, J.P. Morgan, Martha Stewart and Steve Jobs all have in common? They’re all among the greatest entrepreneurs of all time. They’re people who had the courage, determination and belief in themselves to pursue a dream, to overcome challenges, and nurture ideas to fruition. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re exploring what it means to be an entrepreneur. Our guest is Kevin Siskar. He's the Managing Director of the Founder Institute in New York and host of the Ambition Today Podcast.

Direct download: cs170416.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

For generations, kids, mainly little boys, have played with little green soldiers. Go into any dollar store and you’re bound to find a bag of them for sale. But, among today’s video game-obsessed youth, are toy soldiers still relevant? The answer is a resounding yes if you ask Jamie Delson. He's the founder and owner of The Toy Soldier Company, based right across the Hudson River from Manhattan, in Jersey City. Delson talks about his passion for toy soldiers and his business selling them on this week's Cityscape. We'll also head to Manhattan’s Lower East Side to visit another toy company. Well, sort of. The Lower East Side Toy Company is actually a front for a modern-day speakeasy called the Backroom.

Direct download: cs170409.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

If you’re a regular listener of Cityscape you know we don’t settle for the status quo. We aim to uncover hidden attractions and unique things to see, do and, sometimes eat in New York City. On this week's Cityscape, we're hitting up a Mexican restaurant on Manhattan’s Lower East Side that doesn’t just serve up your typical burrito and taco. The Black Ant incorporates insects, namely grasshoppers and ants, into nearly every aspect of the menu. We're also talking with Atlas Obscura Associate Editor Ella Morton about unusual things to do in New York City. And the New York Botanical Garden might not be the most obscure destination in New York City, but it is the go-to place if you want to explore unique plants and flowers.  In fact, the NYBG is right now wowing visitors with a display of rare and exotic orchids. In this episode, you'll hear from the man behind the garden’s 15th annual orchid show, which has a Thailand theme.

Direct download: cs170302.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

To some they’re works of art or a unique form of expression -- to others they’re an abomination. We're talking about tattoos. A new exhibit at the New York Historical Society explores 300 years of tattooing in New York City. It’s called Tattooed New York. The exhibit traces tattooing from its roots in Native American body art to its embrace by sailors, soldiers and circus sideshow performers, through its place in mainstream culture today. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently walked through the exhibit with curator Cristian Petru Panaite.

Direct download: cs170326pod.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

This month marks the 143rd birthday of Harry Houdini. Houdini was born on March 24th,1874 as Erik Weisz in Budapest. But, eventually the legendary magician made his way to New York City, where he honed his craft of illusion and wowed audiences with death-defying escape acts and near-impossible stunts. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re tapping into the magic of Harry Houdini with a visit to the Houdini Museum of New York. It’s located within the headquarters of Fantasma Magic, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of magic tricks. We're also talking with a great nephew of Harry Houdini.

Direct download: cs030519pod.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Coping with the loss of someone or something you love can be one of life’s biggest challenges. Often, the pain of loss can feel overwhelming. You can be hit with a wave of unexpected emotions, from shock and anger to guilt and disbelief. In this program, we’ll get a better understanding of the grieving process and learn how to best confront painful emotions. Our guests are Ann Tramontana-Veno, the Executive Director of Hope After Loss. The Connecticut-based organization helps people through the loss of a pregnancy or an infant, and Deborah Oster Pannell, a resident of the Bronx who is representing A Caring Hand. The New York City-based organization offers a variety of programs to help grieving children and families.

Direct download: cs170312.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Behind every business, there’s a story worth knowing, like the story of the two sisters behind the wildly popular Alice’s Tea Cup restaurants in New York City, or the story behind the Willy Wonky of Bushwick, Brooklyn, Daniel Sklaar. Just how did the one-time financial analyst go on to open his Fine & Raw chocolate factory in 2012? On this edition of Cityscape, the story behind two successful New York City businesses. Both came to our attention this winter as we longed for hot drinks. Fine & Raw makes a mean hot chocolate, and Alice’s Tea Cup has a wide variety of teas to warm the body and soul.

Direct download: cs170305pod.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The name might not be as familiar as Trump when it comes to development in New York City, especially these days, but Zeckendorf is a moniker that has played a pivotal role in shaping the city’s skyline.

First there was the larger-than-life William Zeckendorf senior, who among other things, assembled the land on which the United Nations rose in the late 1940’s. Then there was his much more understated son William Zeckendorf Junior who built several projects, including Worldwide Plaza in Manhattan. His sons have since carried on the family tradition.

Late in his life William Zeckendorf Junior penned a memoir. But, he died in 2014 before it was published. That’s where his wife Nancy comes in. She made it her mission to see her husband’s story told. Nancy has quite the story of her own. She’s a former principal dancer for the Metropolitan Opera Ballet. These days Nancy spends most of her time in Santa Fe, where she and Bill retired. But, she still has a home in New York City. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently caught up with her there for a chat.

Direct download: cs170226.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

New York is undeniably a magical city with its rich history, towering skyscrapers and plethora of things to do. But, it’s also magical in a literal sense. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re talking with a couple of the guys behind New York City’s longest running off-broadway magic show: Monday Night Magic.

Direct download: cs170219.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Love is in the air this time of year. And as Valentine’s Day approaches, a lot of people are searching for the perfect way to show that special someone how they feel about them. Of course, chocolate has become synonymous with Valentine’s Day. On this week's Cityscape, we’ll be delving into the history of chocolate, as well as visiting a chocolate shop in Lower Manhattan that had us at first bite. It's called Stick With Me Sweets. We're also exploring other "matters of the heart." More specifically -- Heart Gallery NYC. The non-profit organization taps the artistic talents of notable photographers to help kids in need of families and a permanent place to call home.

Direct download: cs170212.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

It’s one of life’s ultimate questions: Are you a cat person or a dog person? On this week’s Cityscape, we have something for both feline and canine lovers. We’ll talk with the founder of an organization that works to help improve the lives of homeless dogs in the New York City area. It’s called Foster Dogs NYC. We’ll also talk with Tamar Arslanian, the author of the book Shop Cats of New York, as well as the blog ihavecat.com

Direct download: cs170122.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The Nutcracker ballet is a holiday classic featuring different styles of dance and a magical story. But what happens if you take the dancers off of the stage and thrust them into daily life? On this week's Cityscape, we're talking with photographer Jordan Matter about his books Dancers Among Us and Dancers After Dark that use professional dancers to see ordinary life in an extraordinary way. We'll also talk with someone who experienced Dancers After Dark from the other side of Jordan's camera lens, dancer Demetia Hopkins-Greene.

Direct download: cs170129.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

The New York Times recently named the South Bronx as one of the 52 places travelers should plan to visit in the coming year. Now, if you're hung up on images of what the South Bronx looked like in the 1970s and early 80s when burned-out buildings and gangs dominated the area, that probably comes as a big surprise. But, the South Bronx has come a long way over the years. It's no longer burning -- it's gentrifying. Take a walk around and you'll discover trendy coffee shops, galleries and boutiques. Public radio station, WNYC, is documenting the affordability crisis and changing neighborhoods across New York City. They're doing this one by one, and kicked things off with Mott Haven in the South Bronx. WNYC associate producer Sophia Paliza-Carre joins us on this week's Cityscape to talk about the project. We're also joined by a Bronx native on a mission to open an independent bookstore/wine bar in the South Bronx. Right now the Bronx doesn't have a single bookstore.

Direct download: cs160122.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

People from all over come to New York City for the various networking opportunities it provides. But what people may not know is that when they ride the subways or check their emails, they’re involved with different kinds of networks. On this week's Cityscape, we're exploring the networks that makeup our city, from bridges to broadband, and how they impact the hustle and bustle that New York is known for.

Direct download: cs170115.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST

Rock and roll and drugs have, historically, often gone hand in hand. Many musicians are dealing with, have dealt with, or have died from addiction. The list is long and includes names like Amy Winehouse and Janis Joplin. But, while the lifestyle of a musician can be supportive of addiction, it could also be used to help combat the problem. Enter Road Recovery, an organization that helps young people recovering from addiction and other adversities by harnessing the influence of entertainment industry professionals who have confronted similar crises and now wish to share their experience, knowledge, and resources. Road Recovery co-founder Gene Bowen and board member Simon Kirke are our guests on this week's Cityscape. Simon is a drummer best known as a member of Free and Bad Company.

Direct download: cs170108.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EST



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