People move to New York City for a variety of reasons -- for a new job, to make it on Broadway, to go to college. But, for novelist, playwright and activist Joseph Caldwell, it was largely about finding sexual freedom. 

Caldwell's new memoir In the Shadow of the Bridge details his life as a gay man and lovestruck writer in New York City. His story captures the before, during and after of the AIDS epidemic, taking us all the way back to when you could rent an apartment in Manhattan for a mere $24 a month. 

Direct download: cs200202.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Big changes are taking place in the U.S. to keep at-risk kids out of residential treatment centers and safely with their families. It’s a result of the Federal Family First Prevention Services Act. The approach is similar to one New York City has championed to reduce the number of kids in foster care over the past 10 years. Advocates say they are pleased to see the federal government catching up.
 
Our guests this week are Danielle Gaffney and Vincent Madera from the non-profit organization, The Children’s Village. Danielle has been with Children’s Village for around 30 years. She currently serves as the Vice President of Community Based Foster Care overseeing adoption and foster care, supportive housing and shelter services. Vincent has been with Children’s Village for more than ten years. He started as an assistant manager in the Residential Treatment Center. Today he serves as the Director of the Children’s Village Institute, which includes overseeing their family finding and aftercare programs. 
Direct download: cs200126rr.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City is among a growing number of places working to develop a more inclusive curriculum in schools. That involves ensuring educators are using materials that represent students of different backgrounds. 
 
Teaching Matters is working with schools in New York City to support its efforts to promote culturally responsive teaching strategies. Our guest this week is Lynette Guastaferro, Teaching Matters CEO. 
 
Direct download: cs200119r.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

It’s estimated that between 25 and 30 million Americans live with a rare disease. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people. 
 
On this week's Cityscape, we're meeting a Bronx doctor who has devoted her life to identifying rare diseases in children. Dr. Melissa Wasserstein is chief of Pediatric Genetic Medicine at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore and professor of Pediatrics and Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 
Direct download: cs200112.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City has a lot at stake in 2020. The Census is coming, and if residents aren’t properly counted, the Big Apple stands to lose federal funding and electoral representation. So what are government, community and civic leaders doing to ensure a full and accurate count? 
 
In this week's episode of Cityscape, we’ll be talking with two people on the front lines in the quest for a complete count:
 
  • Katie Leonberger is the President and CEO of Community Resources Exchange. CRE is working to help nonprofit and community-based organizations with their 2020 Census education and outreach efforts.
  • Aldrin Bonilla is Manhattan’s Deputy Borough President. Alrdin is heavily involved with making sure there’s an accurate count of Manhattanites in the 2020 Census. He’s also working hard to protect people from census-related scams. 
Direct download: cs200105.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT



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