New York City is made up of several islands. The big ones, like Manhattan and Staten Island, need no introduction. Even some of the smaller ones have significant name recognition, like Coney Island and City Island. But, how much do you know about the islands not accessible to the general public? On this week's Cityscape we're exploring a couple of mysterious islands in New York City -- Hart Island and North Brother Island.

Direct download: cs170625.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

She was a Hollywood sensation known for her beauty and charisma. She died young -- at the age of 36. But, more than 50 years after her death, Marilyn Monroe is still an icon. Her image can be seen everywhere from t-shirts to coffee mugs. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re focusing on Marilyn’s time -- not in Tinseltown -- but in New York City. Our guest is Elizabeth Winder, the author of Marilyn in Manhattan: Her Year of Joy.

Direct download: cs170604.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

The name Norman Bel Geddes is not as commonly known as Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell or Henry Ford. But, Bel Geddes’ designs are reflected in everything from cocktail shakers to radios to kitchen appliances. Bel Geddes may be best known for the massive Futurama exhibit at the 1939 World's Fair in Queens. Alex Szerlip is the author of a new biography of the iconic designer and inventor. It’s called The Man Who Designed the Future: Norman Bel Geddes and the Invention of 20th Century America. Alex is our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Direct download: cs170528.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York is one of the most the most photographed cities in the world. Amateur and professional photographers alike have long found inspiration in the Big Apple. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing in on two great photographers in New York City history -- Alice Austen and Todd Webb. Austen was one of the nation’s earliest and most prolific female photographers, and Webb has been called the best mid-century photographer you've never heard of. That’s because he’s not nearly as well known as some of his predecessors and contemporaries, like Edward Weston and Berneice Abbott. A new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York aims to change that. It’s called “A City Seen: Todd Webb’s Postwar New York 1945-1960.”

Direct download: cs170521.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Food has the power to do much more than nourish our bodies. Just the taste of a certain dish can conjure up vivid memories of people and places in our past. Our guest this week is Peter Gethers. He’s an author, screenwriter, playwright, book editor and film and television producer. His latest book pays tribute to his mom, Judy Gethers, who was a celebrated cook and cookbook writer. It’s called My Mother’s Kitchen: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life.

Direct download: cs170514.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Imagine going undercover as a New York City taxi driver. What stories might emerge from your back seat? Our guest this week is French producer and filmmaker Benoit Cohen. Benoit spent months driving a cab to help him research his next movie. Not only is that film now in the works, his experiences behind the wheel of a taxi also spawned a book called Yellow Cab.

Direct download: cs170507.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:30am EDT

The Mohegan Indians knew it as Aquehung or "River of High Bluffs." We know it as the Bronx River. The roughly 24-mile river runs deep with history, a history that includes a whole lot of pollution. On this week's Cityscape we're talking with Maggie Scott Greenfield, the Executive Director of the Bronx River Alliance. The organization is committed to protecting, improving and restoring the Bronx River corridor.

Direct download: cs170430.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

The American theater has a rich history that stretches from it origins in vaudeville to today’s hit musical Hamilton, with a score rooted in Hip-Hop and Rap. This week, we’re exploring the evolution of American culture -- how we went from a time where sideshow acts were seen alongside fine art, to the emergence of orchestras and art museums, to now, when a gala at the Met is attended by celebrity icons like Beyonce and the Kardashians.

*** Note -- Cityscape producer Zach Zalis is sitting in for George Bodarky as host.

Direct download: cs170423.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

What do names like Ben Franklin, J.P. Morgan, Martha Stewart and Steve Jobs all have in common? They’re all among the greatest entrepreneurs of all time. They’re people who had the courage, determination and belief in themselves to pursue a dream, to overcome challenges, and nurture ideas to fruition. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re exploring what it means to be an entrepreneur. Our guest is Kevin Siskar. He's the Managing Director of the Founder Institute in New York and host of the Ambition Today Podcast.

Direct download: cs170416.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

For generations, kids, mainly little boys, have played with little green soldiers. Go into any dollar store and you’re bound to find a bag of them for sale. But, among today’s video game-obsessed youth, are toy soldiers still relevant? The answer is a resounding yes if you ask Jamie Delson. He's the founder and owner of The Toy Soldier Company, based right across the Hudson River from Manhattan, in Jersey City. Delson talks about his passion for toy soldiers and his business selling them on this week's Cityscape. We'll also head to Manhattan’s Lower East Side to visit another toy company. Well, sort of. The Lower East Side Toy Company is actually a front for a modern-day speakeasy called the Backroom.

Direct download: cs170409.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT



-->

Syndication

Categories

Archives

June 2017
S M T W T F S
     
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30