New York City is known as “the city that never sleeps.” But since the coronavirus pandemic hit, nightlife venues and organizations have had to go to bed, leaving venues struggling to stay afloat.

House of Yes in Bushwick, Brooklyn is slowly awakening from its slumber, having recently reopened for outdoor activities. But, the venue, which has been described as a mix of “Studio 54 and Cirque du Soleil” is far from returning to normal. 

We recently caught up with Kae Burke, one of House of Yes' founders, via Zoom. We talked about how House of Yes is doing amidst the pandemic, the origins of the venue, and what nightlife in New York City might look like in the future. 

 
Direct download: CS200802web.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City has long been known for its bustling nightlife scene.

We're familiar with images of people dressed to the nines packed into posh clubs dancing the night away and jazz musicians performing before more intimate crowds at venues in Greenwich Village. But, the coronavirus pandemic has put the city that never sleeps to bed, leaving its vibrant nightlife scene in a deep slumber.

Even as the city continues to re-open, it’s unlikely nightclubs, music venues and performance spaces will return to normalcy anytime soon.

A group of individuals and venues associated with New York City’s nightlife scene have launched an emergency relief fund to help venues as they struggle through the COVID-19 pandemic. On this week's Cityscape we'll talk with Ric Leichtung, a founding partner of  NYC Nightlife United

We'll also hear from J.C. Diaz, president of the American Nightlife Association.

Direct download: cs200726web.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

COVID-19 and AIDS are, of course, different diseases, but those who have been on the front lines in the battle against HIV/AIDS see parallels between the crises.

Our guest in this episode is Sharen Duke, Executive Director and CEO of The Alliance for Positive Change. She joins us to talk about how the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic compare to now, and the challenges New Yorkers with HIV/AIDS and other chronic health conditions are facing with coronavirus.

Direct download: AIDSshowwfuvweb.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Today Lower Manhattan residents seeking to escape the city in the hot summer months may head to the Hamptons or the Jersey Shore, but in the 1800s, midtown Manhattan was the place to go for a quick getaway.

Between 1826 and 1833, The Mount Vernon Hotel on East 61st Street was the go-to place for New Yorkers looking to escape the hustle bustle of the city, which at the time extended only as far north as 14th Street.

The hotel is now a museum.

Unfortunately, the museum is temporarily closed to due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but its virtual doors are open. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with the museum’s director, Terri Daly.

Direct download: mvhotelweb.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:35pm EDT

Today Lower Manhattan residents seeking to escape the city in the hot summer months may head to the Hamptons or the Jersey Shore, but in the 1800s, midtown Manhattan was the place to go for a quick getaway.

Between 1826 and 1833, The Mount Vernon Hotel on East 61st Street was the go-to place for New Yorkers looking to escape the hustle bustle of the city, which at the time extended only as far north as 14th Street.

The hotel is now a museum.

Unfortunately, the museum is temporarily closed to due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but its virtual doors are open. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with the museum’s director, Terri Daly.

Direct download: mvhotelweb.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:35pm EDT

For a lot of New Yorkers, the city’s parks have become sanctuaries, providing a much needed escape from the confines of their homes during the coronavirus pandemic. But advocates are concerned tough economic times ahead could mean less funding for our urban oases. 

In this episode of Cityscape we'll hear from Adam Ganser, Executive Director of New Yorkers for Parks and Michelle Luebke, Director of Environmental Stewardship with Bronx River Alliance

Direct download: parksshowweb.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:17pm EDT

 

The curtain is coming up on some aspects of life in New York City, but you can expect it to remain down on Broadway for a while longer due to the coronavirus pandemic.  And if you’re wondering how long a while is. Well, that remains to be seen.

In this edition of Cityscape, we'll talk with Charlotte St. Martin, president of the Broadway League, about the future of the Great White Way.

We'll also hear from photographer Peter Pabon, who has been traversing New York City to document life amidst the coronavirus pandemic. 

Direct download: cs200704web.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:14pm EDT

This has been a school year like no other. When the coronavirus pandemic hit, schools were forced to switch to remote learning. But, the reviews on how that has gone over the last few months are mixed to say the least. 
 
The organization Teaching Matters has been helping schools in some of New York City’s poorest districts navigate the challenges of having to quickly pivot to online learning, challenges the non-profit expects to continue into the new school year.
 
Lynette Guastaferro is CEO of Teaching Matters. Cityscape host George Bodarky talked with her about her organization’s work in helping teachers switch from a brick and mortar classroom to teaching online. 
Direct download: cs200621_1.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:33pm EDT

A lot of us are dealing with the challenges of reemerging into society after months of quarantine, but reentry during a pandemic poses much greater challenges for individuals getting out of prison. Enter the Fortune Society, a New York City based organization that provides essential support for people getting out of prison and promotes alternatives to incarceration.

In this episode of Cityscape, host George Bodarky talks with JoAnne Page, President and CEO of the Fortune Society. 

Direct download: cs200214.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:40pm EDT

The coronavirus pandemic has hit small businesses across the country hard. They were forced to quickly shut their doors with no clear timeline for when they could re-open. In New York City establishments that sell food and drink were among those deemed essential, and that proved to be an accidental lifeline for one Brooklyn shop.

Jane Motorcycles in Williamsburg is not your ordinary retail store. In addition to selling motorcycles and apparel, they have a coffee bar, and because of that, Jane Motorcycles was allowed to stay open during the pandemic. They even added gourmet sandwiches and other food items to their menu in the midst of the outbreak. Citycape host George Bodarky recently talked with the founders of Jane Motorcycles on Zoom. 

Direct download: cs200607.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Since the late 1800s, Volunteers of America has been working to assist many of New York City’s most vulnerable populations. And that effort continues today in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Cityscape host George Bodarky talked with President and CEO of Volunteers of America-Greater New York, Tere Pettitt, via Zoom.

Direct download: csvoa.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:26pm EDT

With nearly 51,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, Brooklyn is one of the most impacted areas in the hardest-hit city in the United States.

Cityscape Host George Bodarky recently talked with Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams about a wide range of issues, from racial disparities in the age of coronavirus to how the city should look to shore up an economy in crisis. They spoke via Zoom.

Direct download: csbpadams.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:15pm EDT

Like many cultural institutions, Flushing Town Hall in Queens had to quickly pivot to online programming in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

While its physical doors might be closed, its virtual doors remain wide open. Cityscape Host George Bodarky recently talked with Flushing Town Hall’s Executive and Artistic Director Ellen Kodadek, a self-proclaimed hugger, about how she and her institution are managing in the age of social distancing. 

 

Direct download: cs200517new.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City is full of things to see and do, but these days, well -- coronavirus! The pandemic has brought so much to a halt, including tours of iconic landmarks and historic neighborhoods.

Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with tour guide Jeremy Wilcox about how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting him and others in the industry. Jeremy is a lifelong New Yorker and treasurer of the Guides Association of New York City. They chatted via Zoom.

Direct download: cs200531new.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:11pm EDT

The frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic include a long list of characters from healthcare professionals to grocery store workers to truck drivers. But, there’s also an army of girls and young women doing their part to help the nation through this challenging time. In fact, for more than 100 years, the Girl Scouts have been pitching in during all kinds of crises.

Meridith Maskara is the Chief Executive Officer of the Girl Scouts of Greater New York.  Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with her via Zoom about the organization’s long-standing tradition of helping out in times of turmoil.

Direct download: cs200510new.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Between two world wars, the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, the September 11th terrorist attacks and Superstorm Sandy, the Third Street Music School Settlement on Manhattan’s Lower East Side has seen a lot in its 125 year history.

But just how is the nation’s longest-running community music school weathering the storm of the coronavirus outbreak?

Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with Third Street’s Executive Director, Valerie Lewis, via Zoom.

Direct download: cs200503new.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

In times of crisis, strong leadership is critical for an organization. But, how can a leader lead when facing a terrifying illness?

Eric Yaverbaum is the CEO of Ericho Communications in New York City. In the midst of leading his company through the coronavirus crisis, Eric himself was diagnosed with COVID-19. Cityscape host George Bodarky talked with him via Zoom about how he’s navigating his company through these challenging times, and to get his advice on how other leaders can do their best in unchartered territory.

Direct download: CS200426new.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Empty sidewalks in New York City mean few if any customers for street vendors. In fact, most street vendors are staying inside themselves. The idea of lugging out their carts for a few dollars and putting themselves in jeopardy of getting sick provides little incentive.

To learn more about the impact the coronavirus outbreak is having on street vendors, Cityscape host George Bodarky talked with the Director of the Street Vendor Project, Mohamed Attia, via Zoom. 

Direct download: cs200419new.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York is a great city for the arts, but just what the art scene will look like in the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic remains to be seen. The outbreak is having a devastating impact on the art world. The lights on Broadway have gone dark, museums remain shuttered, and gallery walks have come to a halt. The New York Foundation for the Arts is taking several steps to help artists get through this crisis. On this week's Cityscape, we talk with NYFA’s Executive Director Michael L. Royce via Zoom.

Music discovery starts here.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

PRIMARY TABS

 

THE ARTS AND THE PANDEMIC

 
FileAudio Player
by
 

New York is a great city for the arts, but just what the art scene will look like in the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic remains to be seen. The outbreak is having a devastating impact on the art world. The lights on Broadway have gone dark, museums remain shuttered, and gallery walks have come to a halt. 

The New York Foundation for the Arts is taking several steps to help artists get through this crisis. On this week's Cityscape, we talk with NYFA’s Executive Director Michael L. Royce via Zoom.

***music for this episode is courtesy of Blue Dot Sessions***

Direct download: cs200412new.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:50am EDT

Magazines still line newsstands and you’ll see some of them at the checkout counter at the supermarket, but the industry is not as glossy as it used to be. While many magazines have folded, others have transitioned to a digital format.
 
On this week's show, we're looking back at 50 years of magazine making with Walter Bernard. He's been the designer and art director of many of the best known magazines and newspapers in the United States, including Time, Fortune and the Atlantic. 
 
He also worked at New York Magazine in its early days. The job was offered to him by New York Magazine co-founder Milton Glaser. Bernard and Glaser recount their days working together at New York Magazine and their work on many of the nation’s other best-known publications in a new book called Mag Men
Direct download: cs200322.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Brooklyn resident Jonathan Samson is the first board-certified music therapist in history to receive a Grammy for Best Children's Album. 
 
Jonathan is the founder of CoCreative Music, a private practice in Brooklyn where he offers a unique combination of music therapy, audio/video production, artistic mentoring and life coaching to inspire "The Child Archetype" in all ages.
 
He joins us this week to talk about his music and music therapy practice. 
Direct download: cs200315.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Even in a city as densely populated as New York, people can be — or at least feel — very alone. And the fact of the matter is loneliness can have serious consequences on a person’s physical and mental health.
 
Jillian Richardson is on a mission to make the world less lonely. She's the founder of The Joy List. It’s described as a resource for people to find events that they can go to by themselves, and leave with a new friend. Jillian’s also the author of the book Unlonely Planet: How Healthy Congregations Can Change the World. She's our guest in this special presentation, produced in conjunction with BronxNet Television
Direct download: cs200308sac.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

A favorite family recipe has the power to pass love and culture down through generations. 
 
Our guest on this week's Cityscape believes in this power so much that he decided to write a book about it, highlighting his own heritage and hoping he can reach a new audience with it.
 
Kevin Noble Maillard’s new children’s book Fry Bread is a celebration of Native American family tradition through a delicious dish. With Juana Martinez-Neal’s illustrations, the book shows a culture Maillard says is all too often excluded from children’s literature.
Direct download: cs200301.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Our guest this week Bob Eckstein, an award-winning writer, illustrator and cartoonist. Bob's had his cartoons published in the New York Times, MAD Magazine and the New Yorker. They’ve also been featured in the Cartoon Art Museum of San Francisco, the Smithsonian Institute, and the Cartoon Museum of London.

Bob's also a snowman expert. He wrote a book called The Illustrated History of the Snowman. Bob’s latest book is Everyone’s a Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book. It features a collection of New Yorker cartoons that celebrate “the art of the drawn critique.”

 
Direct download: cs200223.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

It’s estimated that 1.1 million people in the United States are living with HIV. New York State is aiming to be the first state in the country to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic by the end of 2020. 
 
Doug Wirth is the President and CEO of Amida Care. Amida Care has a wide network of health care providers throughout New York City and is the largest Medicaid Special Needs Health Plan (SNP) in New York State. Doug joins us on this week's Cityscape to talk about New York’s initiative to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and how Amida care is contributing to that effort. Doug served on Governor Cuomo’s Ending the Epidemic Task Force, which came up with a blueprint to snuff out AIDS. Doug is our guest on this week's Cityscape. 
Direct download: cs200216.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

The repurposing of houses of worship has become a trend across the United States. As congregations face dwindling numbers, they’re often left with the choice of selling the buildings they can no longer afford or finding new uses for them. On this week's Cityscape, we’re looking at what happens when a dying church takes on a new life. 
 
Direct download: cs200209.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

People move to New York City for a variety of reasons -- for a new job, to make it on Broadway, to go to college. But, for novelist, playwright and activist Joseph Caldwell, it was largely about finding sexual freedom. 

Caldwell's new memoir In the Shadow of the Bridge details his life as a gay man and lovestruck writer in New York City. His story captures the before, during and after of the AIDS epidemic, taking us all the way back to when you could rent an apartment in Manhattan for a mere $24 a month. 

Direct download: cs200202.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Big changes are taking place in the U.S. to keep at-risk kids out of residential treatment centers and safely with their families. It’s a result of the Federal Family First Prevention Services Act. The approach is similar to one New York City has championed to reduce the number of kids in foster care over the past 10 years. Advocates say they are pleased to see the federal government catching up.
 
Our guests this week are Danielle Gaffney and Vincent Madera from the non-profit organization, The Children’s Village. Danielle has been with Children’s Village for around 30 years. She currently serves as the Vice President of Community Based Foster Care overseeing adoption and foster care, supportive housing and shelter services. Vincent has been with Children’s Village for more than ten years. He started as an assistant manager in the Residential Treatment Center. Today he serves as the Director of the Children’s Village Institute, which includes overseeing their family finding and aftercare programs. 
Direct download: cs200126rr.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City is among a growing number of places working to develop a more inclusive curriculum in schools. That involves ensuring educators are using materials that represent students of different backgrounds. 
 
Teaching Matters is working with schools in New York City to support its efforts to promote culturally responsive teaching strategies. Our guest this week is Lynette Guastaferro, Teaching Matters CEO. 
 
Direct download: cs200119r.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

It’s estimated that between 25 and 30 million Americans live with a rare disease. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people. 
 
On this week's Cityscape, we're meeting a Bronx doctor who has devoted her life to identifying rare diseases in children. Dr. Melissa Wasserstein is chief of Pediatric Genetic Medicine at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore and professor of Pediatrics and Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 
Direct download: cs200112.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

New York City has a lot at stake in 2020. The Census is coming, and if residents aren’t properly counted, the Big Apple stands to lose federal funding and electoral representation. So what are government, community and civic leaders doing to ensure a full and accurate count? 
 
In this week's episode of Cityscape, we’ll be talking with two people on the front lines in the quest for a complete count:
 
  • Katie Leonberger is the President and CEO of Community Resources Exchange. CRE is working to help nonprofit and community-based organizations with their 2020 Census education and outreach efforts.
  • Aldrin Bonilla is Manhattan’s Deputy Borough President. Alrdin is heavily involved with making sure there’s an accurate count of Manhattanites in the 2020 Census. He’s also working hard to protect people from census-related scams. 
Direct download: cs200105.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT



-->

Syndication

Categories

Archives

August 2020
S M T W T F S
     
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31